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Ecuador to Barra De Navidad, Mexico-Days 7,8,9

Ecuador to Barra De Navidad, Mexico. Days 4-5-6-2016.

Ecuador to Barra De Navidad,Mexico- Days 1-2-3.

NOVEMBER 9TH-2016, A DELAY DEPARTURE

Hola, Amigo’s.

Sailors run has been delayed because of major 3-day holiday, making checking out impossible and then when we could go there was not enough water to get out across the bar into “open water”.

We will be departing on November 11th and the race is still on with David on the Bristol-40. You should get the first adventure on or near the 14th.
I recently found out that the Around the World Articles I wrote is in Sail magazine actually started in the November issue not the October issue and also the December Issue is coming out as well
Back to pacing the “decks” until the 11th.
Your Amigo the Jefe’

MY ARTICLE IN NOVEMBER ISSUE OF SAIL MAGAZINE

MY ARTICLE IN NOVEMBER ISSUE OF SAIL MAGAZINE

A BIT OF THE ARTICLE IN SAIL MAGAZINE

A BIT OF THE ARTICLE IN SAIL MAGAZINE

2ND ARTICLE IN DECEMBER ISSUE OF SAIL MAGAZINE

2ND ARTICLE IN DECEMBER ISSUE OF SAIL MAGAZINE

A BIT OF THE ARTICLE IN THE SAIL MAGAZINE

A BIT OF THE ARTICLE IN THE SAIL MAGAZINE

Sailors Run Prep’s for Sea

SAILORS RUN CHECKING IN FROM ALBUQUERQUE,NEW MEX

Sailors run checking in from Albuquerque, New Mexico.

It has been an interesting three months with much going on in the lives of team “Sailors Run”.

We are in the process of attempting to purchase a home in Albuquerque, so Debbie can be closer to family and have the opportunity to be an influence in her grand children’s lives.

Now for me little has changed, I will be going to Washington State to visit family and friends as well as attend the Bob Perry Rendevous in Port Ludlow, Washington on Saturday the 20th of August and invite anyone that wants to catch up with me to meet me there as this is the one time and place I know where I will be during my three plus weeks in Washington State.

Unfortunately Debbie will not be with me as she will be finalizing the deal on the house in Albuquerque.

I will be back in Ecuador on the 14th of September to ready Sailors Run to put back out to sea once again, as I plan to sail the clipper route up to Barra De Navidad, Mexico in early November.

Your Amigo the Jefe.’

SAILORS RUN CHECKING IN FROM BAHIA CARAQUEZ,ECUADO


 Debbie and I just want you all to know that not only are we alive and well in Bahia, but so is the spirit of the Ecuadorian people. We can already see the beginning of Bahia coming back with new construction occurring right behind the demolition of damaged buildings.
  Puerto Amistad has reopened with a new owner, yet most of the old staff whom we like very well are still here. The good news is the cost of moorage has been reduced by almost 100-dollars and the restaurant is now open at 7 am for breakfast and many of the dinner meal costs have been reduced by 2-dollars each and the cost of a 22-oz beer is just 2-dollars down from a recent increase of 2.50 per beer.

 Of course Bahia has a long way to go to get housing for everyone, yet we believe it will all happen over the next 5-years. We also want cruisers to be aware that we feel it is very safe here, and security for boats left here for returning to US or Canada, or inland travel is very good.
  Soon Debbie and I will fly to New Mexico and Washington State where we plan to spend the next 3-months, visiting friends and family not to mention getting many things repaired from the boat and replacement of other damaged equipment.
  We will be getting some photos out on our blog www.sailorsrun.com once we get back in the states
  We wish you al a great summer with lots of adventure thrown in.
                                            Your Amigos Jeff& Debbie

Around Alone Days-202-203 and the last 8-hrs and 49-minutes

 

SAILORS RUN & JEFF   AT LAST COMING INTO BAHIA CARAQUEZ, ECUADOR

SAILORS RUN & JEFF AT LAST COMING INTO BAHIA CARAQUEZ, ECUADOR

THIS IS JEFF NOW, WE HAD AGREED HE WOULD NOT CUT HIS HAIR OR BEARD FOR HIS TIME OUT. HIS BEARD IS VERY SOFT THO

THIS IS JEFF NOW, WE HAD AGREED HE WOULD NOT CUT HIS HAIR OR BEARD FOR HIS TIME OUT.
HIS BEARD IS VERY SOFT THO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WE FINALLY HAD OUR BIG HUG AFTER 8 MONTHS OF NOT SEEING EACH OTHER

WE FINALLY HAD OUR BIG HUG AFTER 8 MONTHS OF NOT SEEING EACH OTHER

 

 

LAND HO AT LAST AND THE  GROUND FEELS SOLID

LAND HO AT LAST AND THE GROUND FEELS SOLID

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Around Alone Days-202-203 and the last 8-hrs and 49-minutes.

Total Miles sailed=25,147nm.

Miles sailed last 2+days=223nm.

Miles left to go =0

Top speed on trip=14.1kts..

DAY-202.
24hr.Run=104nm. Pos. Lat.01*48’S Long.81*24’W. Weather=Bar=1007mb. Wind=4-8kts. S. Seas= 4-6ft. S. Cabin Temp=74*-78*
Today I find myself sailing in frustratingly light winds attempting to get to the finish line to seal “the deal”. I flew the spinnaker for 5-hrs until the winds became to fickle to keep it up.
I was amazed at the shipping traffic that I found “Sailors Run” in while sailing across the Gulf of Guayaquil. I had 20-targets on the A.I.S. all at once. At one point I thought we were going to become the “peanut butter when we found ourselves sandwiched in between 3 ships all within 4-miles of each other and going in different directions.
As night closed in on us the vessel traffic seemed to disappear and 30-miles off shore there appeared to be no fisherman. Now with the guard alarm that goes off if any ship approaches within 7-miles I was at last able to catch an hours sleep here and there.

Day-203.
24hr.Run=78nm. Pos.00*54’S Long.80*48’W. Weather=Bar=1004mb. Wind=0-10kts S. Seas=4-6 ft.S. Cabin Temp.=80-82*

The Last 8hrs and 49 minutes. Last miles =41nm.
Position anchored outside in open road stead anchorage. 00* 35′ S Long.80*27W..

I hope today will be the day we “close the deal” and arrive in Bahia.
I’m starting to feel very emotional as I look forward and watch “Patches” as she pulls along brandishing all her scars from the voyage, and behind me the “Monitor Wind Vane” chatters along as the pendulum shaft bounces up and down loosely in its frame work, yet still continuing to get the job done after all these thousands of miles.
The voyage now seems suddenly so real and nearly complete. A voyage that will probably be remembered long after I’m gone.
This night was to become a “nightmare” as I ended up sailing into one of the largest bunch of fishing panga’s I had ever seen.

They had more than 30-nets stretched out before me and my encounter with these fishing crews amounted to a lot yelling back and forth as I neared their nets. They of course were not aware that Sailors Run can sail right over a net as there are no appendages under the boat that can snag the net. A couple of times I was unable to sail around the nets and had to show them we could sail right over it. This was difficult to do with four or five fisherman yelling at you shining a bright light in your face from their “panga” that they would try to keep in front of your bow to ward you off and away from their nets.
I believe I was called some very bad names, but once they seen their net rise up clear of my stern unscathed they would become very quiet and power away.
Needless to say that by the next day I was becoming very exhausted and still had not made it to Bahia.

=The final hours of the voyage.=
Today with just 40-miles to go to wrap the voyage up I find myself in light air and up against a time dead line to finish in time to catch the high tide to get across the bar. I decided to continue steering after already having been at the helm all night, because I needed to sail as fast as possible in the light winds to make it in.
In the end it was not meant to be and I missed the tide by about 30-minutes. However, that didn’t stop Debbie from getting a panga and bringing me out not only one of the greatest hugs and kisses I have ever gotten but she had fried chicken,fries, and rum, not to mention some very much needed gallons of fresh clean drinking water.

This all put a nice ending to a colossal voyage and yet another night just short of the safety of a protected harbor.
Tomorrow late afternoon I will get across the bar and life can once again become a little less spontaneous and wild a change that I’m sure will fell just fine, at least for a “little while”.

Thanks to all of you for riding along, and just know that I appreciated all of your emails and the great support you have given me.
The Jefe’

 

AROUND ALONE DAYS 199-200-201

LOOKING OUT TOWARDS THE WATER FROM ON TOP OF FRIENDS HOME WHERE JEFF WILL BE COMING FROM

LOOKING OUT TOWARDS THE WATER FROM ON TOP OF FRIENDS HOME WHERE JEFF WILL BE COMING FROM

Total Miles sailed so far=24,921nm.

Miles sailed last three days =422nm.

Distance left to go to finish line off Bahia Caraquez,Ecuador=187nm.

Top Speed so far =4.1kts.

DAY-199.
24hr.Run=137nm. Pos. Lat.07*00’S. Long.82*09′ W. Weather=Bar=1006mb. Wind=SE 12-15kts. Seas= SE 6-8ft. Cabin Temp=78*-83*

Today we find ourselves sailing along in slightly lighter winds that are forecast  to drop even a little more in two days.
At last today I caught a small 24-inch Dorado weighing approximately 4 lbs and cooked it up. It will be enough for two dinners. Yea! fresh food from the sea!!
It was later in the afternoon, as the winds were moderating, that I went forward to slide the block aft on “Patches” so I could let her all the way out to gain speed. I grabbed hold of my forward lower shroud on the lee-side of the mizzen mast as a hand hold and felt it start popping strands as it became very loose.
I scrambled back to the cockpit dropping the mizzen sail to unload the mast and took the halyard forward to the hawser hole amidships on the leeward side where I attached it and tensed it up to help stabilize the mast.
It was then that the I thought about had the forward lower shroud on the windward side had let go, that it would have popped right off and most likely the deck mounted mizzen mast would have toppled into the sea.
I made up a monkeys fist of sorts and tossed a string over both spreaders on the mizzen mast, so I could pull in a line up over them and around the mast and tie a long bowline knot into it enabling the mast to be supported enabling me to retrieve my one and only halyard on that mast. Now I could pull my set of blocks aloft for hoisting me up the mast to replace the unraveling shroud with a piece of 5/16′ line. This project would have to wait until day light as now it was already getting dark.
I saw a small fishing boat pass within 1-2 nm. of us during the night, on one of my looks up top side

DAY-200.
24hr.Run=144nm. Pos. Lat.04*58’S. Long.83*27’W. Weather =Bar=1004mb. Wind=SE 10-15kts. Seas=SE 6-8ft. Cabin Temp=76*-83*

I began my day at 5 am anxious to make the Mizzen operational once again. The breeze was up and we were close reaching at 7 kts in 6-8 ft seas.
I hoisted the blocks aloft on the halyard and attached the bosun chair to the end of them.

As I was climbing into that chair many things were running through my mind, like we are going pretty fast already, maybe this could wait, and if one of those shrouds that are only 5-years old failed what about the other five that now my life is going to have to depend on. I wondered what it might be like to ride the mizzen mast into the sea, and I was unable to visualize a good way to do it. Oh well, at least I had my inflatable life jacket on as a safety harness.
I began pulling myself aloft with my go-pro camera strapped on my head to record the event .It was fortunate I didn’t have to go up over 25 ft but even at that, there were a couple of times that I came loose from the mast flying out and slamming into the shrouds that were trying to “slice and dice” me and then back into the mast where I hit the camera into the mast and the camera in turn took a bite out of my skin at the bridge of my nose.
Once I was at the spreaders I could see that only three of the 19-strands were still holding the shroud aloft. I quickly inspected the other three terminations at the spreaders and they seemed to be “golden” and I hope they will stay that way for the remainder of this voyage.
It was easy to pop off those final 3-strands and I tossed the shroud clear of the boat and into the sea where it streamed alongside the boat as it was still attached to the chain plate below.

Now I pushed the “stem-ball” fitting up out of the spreader position and replaced it with the 7/16″ line that I tied a figure eight “jam-knot” into and sucked it down onto the cup of the hole it passed through.
Once on deck I rigged up a small set of blocks and tensed up the line so that I could remove the long bowline knot and clear the sail track for the mizzen sail. Soon the sail was up and we were all powered up once again.
I believe the rigging on the mizzen is a substandard wire at least not 3/16 stainless as it shows signs of some rusting and I will replace all the shrouds on this mast before putting to sea again.

DAY-201.
24hr.Run=141nm. Pos. Lat.03*16’S. Long.82*09″W. Weather=Bar=1004mb. Wind=SE 10-15kts. Seas=4-6ft. SE. Cabin Temp.72*78*

Still sailing along nicely and just received an email from a friend that Ecuador just had another 6.8 earth quake in the early morning hours. I was anxious to hear if Debbie was all right and I got an email from her letting me know she was.
The earth quake occurred as she was sleeping in her tent under the eaves of the house and she awoke to the screams of a neighbor as the quake began. Debbie bolted from her tent getting clear of the house and ran down into the garden area where our friends were getting out of their tent.  Debbie said that nothing too much really happened right there around them as the earthquake was deep in the ground and no tsunami warning was issued, also the military started immediate patrols of the area to check things out and keep the peace.
It was later in the day when Debbie was at Puerto Amistad and the marina office that another tremor was felt and they all rushed out of there to the middle of the street and she said the girls from Amistad were all frightened and crying as they hugged each other. Pilar, the office head received a phone call that her father had fallen and hit his head and wasn’t breathing, so Debbie and Pillar went with the new owner of Puerto Amistad whom is also a doctor and raced out about 30-minutes to where her father lived. When they arrived other family members were there but Pilar’s father lay dead upon his bed. Our thoughts and prayers go out to Pillar and her family. Sometimes we fail to remember just how fragile life is.
I’m hoping to arrive at the finish line on Friday and must get there by 2:30pm to be taken in across the bar, and it’s going to be very close as to whether I make it in time or not.
I received more information on salty water yesterday from a friend and sailor,a former California water district employee, and he said that one of their wells was putting out water at 1100 parts per-million salt and they considered that potable although their customers complained about the salty taste and he says that they believe that you can drink water up to 2000 parts per million without harming your body, of course it would taste salty.
My current water supply is down to three quarts and I’m good through Sunday and I better “damn” well be there by then; the “Lord” willing.
Last night I seen eight-ships pass during the night, the closes one came was within 3-miles.

On “watch” preparing for “shoring-up” the J

AROUND ALONE DAYS 196-197-198

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

Total Miles sailed so far=24,499 nm.

Miles sailed last 3-Days=412 nm.

Miles left to go to finish off Bahia=581 nm.

THE REST OF THE STORY:

DAY-196 24hr.Run=103nm. Pos. Lat.13*28’S. Long.87*44’W.Weather:Wind =ENE-ESE 10-6-12kts. Seas=SW 4-6ft. Cabin Temp=76*-80*.Bar=1010mb

The SE- trade winds have begun to fill in at last. Now I must pray “Patches” will hold together for this final dash to the finish, in the building trade -winds.
Last evening I was once again treated to an amazing “green flash”, and if it is possible to record one in a video, I surely have it!
It was during one of my late night watch inspection, while panning the horizon that I spotted a huge bright glow coming from over the NW horizon. This glow was surely coming from a large fishing vessel that was all lit up harvesting the sea. We are now just 600 nm off the South American coast and converging with it. As always when a vessel nears land the hazards increase, and vigilance must also increase to stay clear of “harm’s way”.
The large fishing vessel over the horizon did not appear on my A.I.S. a bit concerning and I can only hope he has an A.I.S. receiver on board, receiving my signal as the receiver is much cheaper to purchase than the transmitter.

DAY-197.
24hr.Run=148nm. Pos. Lat.11*21’S. Long.86*34’W. Weather=Bar=1008mb. Wind=E-SE12-18kts. Seas=SE-6-8ft. Cabin Temp=78*-80*.

Sailors Run is now “hauling ass” in the SE Trades! Yahoo!!

Debbie is waiting for me in Bahia and has fresh salt free water that she will bring out to me once across the finish line should I need it. It is possible when I arrive that I might miss the high tide to get across the bar and might have to anchor in the “open road-stead” anchorage off shore overnight.
I would like to share with you one of the hardest things about a voyage solo around the world unassisted south of the 5-great capes.
In my mind it has to be remaining “confident” of your abilities to pull it “all off”.

I must admit that this is very difficult when you and your small vessel are thousands of miles from the nearest help in perilous seas and winds caused by numerous gales and storms over a duration of 4.5 months. This scenario is a huge grinder chafing away at your “personal metal”; something far greater than one can even imagine.
The “Confidence” that is required comes from your knowledge and experience that you bring along about sailing in heavy weather conditions on a well-designed boat. That confidence is shored up and supported by the beliefs of friends and family, that you can do it.

Let me give you a couple of examples: Debbie is my greatest supporter and continually tells me and others I’m the best sailor she knows and I can do this voyage.

Another example is like when I was completing my first rounding of “Cape Horn” back in 2009 and was sailing up the Rio De Plata river a shallow 200-nm body of water approaching Buenos Aires Argentina. I was exhausted and wanted to make the marina at Yacht Club Argentino before dark.

I started up my Perkins diesel and motor sailed a knot faster than I could go without the motor. It was after only two minutes the engine sized and was a total loss. I hadn’t checked the oil as I knew it was full, but because of a knock down in a storm and a broken dip stick tube all the oil was outside the engine in the drip pan.
I’m not a wealthy person by any stretch of the imagination, and this engine scenario was going to cost me 13,000 dollars and Debbie was all excited to celebrate with me in Buenos Aires the successful Cape Horn Trip.

Now all of these events had shattered my confidence and I was seriously thinking about running the boat up on the beach and walking away. I ended up pulling my emails and there was this one brief email from my friend “Willy” and he seemed to know right where I was at in my mind and he wrote this “Jeff you have successfully rounded the greatest cape of all, Cape Horn and you are nearly there, now just “kick its Fnn ass and sail that boat right into Yacht Club Argentino and grab onto something”.  You cannot imagine how that shored up my confidence and suddenly everything became perfectly clear, and simple what I had to do.
So I just want to say ,Thanks to all of you out there that have encouraged me and shored up my confidence helping to make this voyage a success. I do believe we all get by with a little help from our friends.

DAY-198.
24hr.Run=161nm. Pos.08*59’S. Long.85*26’W. Weather=Bar=1007mb.Wind=E SE 15-20kts. Seas=ESE 6-10ft. Cabin Temp=78*-80*.

Trade winds continue to build and we find ourselves close reaching on course with good speed.

Today I became alarmed when suddenly 22 targets appeared on the A.I.S. Once I started pulling the target list up I seen that they were all over 600 miles away. It seems that there was some sort of atmospheric conduit that had opened up the propagation for me to be able to receive these signals, and after about 15 minutes they disappeared off the A.I.S.
Still no rain and I’m still making coffee with the much too salty water, just trying to weather through this drought for a few more days.
I have not yet resorted to drinking my “urine” My daughter “Ginger” thoughtful like she is, suggested that I serve it up in a nice tea cup and add some “herbs” and sip it like an exotic tea. Now I’m sure most “exotic teas” have a name and possibly this one should be called “Me-Tea”; what do think “mates”.
Slipping along thinking about “sipping it up” the Jefe’.