All Posts by Jeff

AROUND ALONE DAYS 142-143-144

DAY- 142 24 hr.Run=70 nm. Pos. Lat.44*56’S. Long.165*40’W. Weather=Bar=1020mb. Wind=SW-W 6-8 kts  Seas=2-4ft. Cabin Temp=60*-62*.

DAY-143 24hr.Run=111nm. Pos. Lat.44*23’S. Long.163*47’W. Weather=Bar=1021mb. Wind=NW 8-12kts. Seas=NW 4-6ft. Cabin Temp=60-64*.

DAY-144 24hr.Run=150nm. Pos. Lat.43*51’S. Long.162* 24’W. Weather= Bar=1023mb. Wind=S-E 8-15kt6s. Seas=6-8ft.

Total Miles sailed so far=18,577nm.

Miles sailed last three days=333nm.

Distance left to go till the turn north=3,224nm.

Top speed so far=14.1kts.

The Rest of the Story.

DAY-142
Today sailing in very light winds as the high pressure begins to move over us.
Of course I sewed on “Patches” for 7-hours and believe the end of this project is just a couple of days away.
I don’t know if Sailors Run will set any records, but I’m pretty sure we will have the record for the most patches ever put on a genoa underway by hand.

DAY-143.
Today sailing a little faster in still light air and of course “Patches” gets her 7-hrs.

I will mention at this time that there were two other boats that I know of, that were attempting solo circumnavigations via the 5-“Great Capes”, and neither attempt has been successful.

The first I heard about was a very brave lady Donna Lang sailing on a 28 ft. Southern Cross sailboat, and she had made it around four of the capes, but on her approach to Cape Horn she was knocked down twice in one hour and sustained damage to some of her equipment on board, and in view of the horrific weather taking place at “Cape Horn” she made a prudent judgment call and sailed north up the coast of South America to finish her circumnavigation via the Panama Canal, and back to the east coast where she started from.
The second vessel I heard about is a Fast-40 sailed by Joe Harris, who was attempting to break the 137-day world record, but had to put in twice for repairs, and the last time he had three to four feet of the bow of his boat that was delaminating and he has thrown in the towel.

So now just know that that the Jefe’ and his “war horse” Sailors Run”, are praying we make it to the finish line.

Debbie and I are very familiar with the Fast-40 as it was the boat that beat us in the 2010 Fernando De Noronha Regatta, the largest sailboat race in Brazil.

It was after he never got properly measured to compete in his own division that they dropped him into our division, a cruising boat division, and we had to race him straight up,”no handicap”.

We had to good friends from Argentina as crew, Hector and Patricia, and after 300nm the Fast-40 only beat us to the finish line by 40-minutes and we ended up coming second.

Day-144nm.
Today is a most welcome day for me as “Patches” is once again back in one Piece, and ready to fly after 23-days, and over 140 hours of hand sewing; my “war horse” Sailors Run” has her most powerful working sail ready to go back on the furler, when the wind conditions will allow it

Once I had “Patches” folded up and ready to go on deck, I pulled the bathroom scale out and jumped on it to see what was left of the “Jefe'”.

Well I weighed 155 lbs when I started this adventure and I’m now weighing in at a lean mean 138 lbs. This is the least I have weighed since the 5th-grade even when training for marathons my least weight was 139 lbs..
I might be on to something here and am thinking of starting Jefe’s off shore weight loss clinics, where you sail off shore for 30-days and only take enough provisions for 15-days.

Results will be guaranteed, but I know I don’t want to be the one guarding the ship’s stores.

These cruises could also be good for alcoholics, as when I ran out of “Rum” I never even missed it, and I think it has a lot to do with the fact that there just is no availability, that would cause one to even think about being tempted to have something to drink “Wow” we are learning so much cool stuff on this voyage.

Tonight I made up gravy with Kirkland canned chicken in it and poured that over a pile of instant mashed potatoes with a can of vegetables and ‘Walla’!! a great dinner was had.
I actually had left over for two more nights, so I put them in the refrigerator “that doesn’t work”.
“Scared Skinny” the Jefe’.

AROUND ALONE DAYS-139-140-141

ENJOYING THE LIGHT WIND SAILING

ENJOYING THE LIGHT WIND SAILING

THE STORY:

Total miles sailed so far=18,246.

Miles sailed the last three days=218nm.

Miles left to go to turn north=3,413.

Top speed so far=14.1 kts

DAY 139  24hr.Run=145nm. Pos. Lat.44*32’S. Long.169*16’W. Weather  Wind=10-18kts SW. Seas=6-10 ft. SW. Cabin Temp=57*-62*.Bar=1017mb.

Today is nice sailing in moderate winds.

I still have no sighting of the Sperm Whale as yet. The Sperm whale is different from most whales as it is not a filter feeder but is more carnivores and eats fish. It has also been known to attack sail boats and sink them after they had rammed into it by accident as the whale slept on the surface at night, and I guess that’s fair enough. I have never seen one and certainly would like to, especially if it were to be in my path, and before I hit it.

SHOWING WHAT A SPERM WHALE LOOKS LIKE AND HOW BIG IT IS, & NOT SURE IF JEFF WILL SEE IT

SHOWING WHAT A SPERM WHALE LOOKS LIKE AND HOW BIG IT IS, & NOT SURE IF JEFF WILL SEE IT

I have some concerns with the Monitor Wind Vane since it is the only thing between me and me having to hand steer the rest of the way back.
There seems to be excessive play in the shaft that the servo rudder is suspended from and swings back and forth on. Right now I’m just lubricating it regularly hoping to reduce the wear.
Of course I spent 7-hrs. sewing on “Patches”, oh well it makes the days fly by fast.

DAY-140 24hr. Run=43nm. Pos. Lat.43*53’S Long.167*59’W Weather= Wind=SE 0-10 kts. Seas=SW 4-6ft. Cabin Temp=59* 62*.Bar=1020mb.

Today I’m plagued by light SE winds that are forcing me more to the north and I need to get south to the 46* to stay in the wind.

After my normal 7-hrs. of sewing on Patches, I glued on 6-small patches with Hypalon Glue for patching the inflatable dinghy, and the glue seemed to work great, and I believe I will avoid future tears that would have come from these small holes that were developing.

I’m happy to report that I had my last green bread tuna sandwich today and discarded the remaining half loaf of 20-week old bread. Please don’t try this with organic bread as I’m sure you would need a jack hammer to tenderize it before eating after two weeks.

I AM ASSUMING THIS IS WHAT JEFF'S SANDWICH LOOKED LIKE WITH A BIT OF MOLD OR LOTS!!

I AM ASSUMING THIS IS WHAT JEFF’S SANDWICH LOOKED LIKE WITH A BIT OF MOLD OR LOTS!!

I’m a little concerned that my cholesterol level is possibly getting to low, as I have no red meat, chips, eggs or none of the good stuff left to eat. I’m thinking that I can possibly warm up, like a half a cup of lard each day and drink it with a little sugar and cinnamon and it might be like eating pie crust without the crust. “I just don’t know what to think about this”. Oh well don’t worry as I might just be feeling the side effects of the last “green tuna sandwich”.

Day-141 24hr.Run=30nm. Pos.Lat.44*13’S Long.167*18’W Weather= Wind=0-5 kts.SW. Seas=0-2ft.SW. Bar=1022mb.

Spent most of this day becalmed in “glassed off” seas, all the time working on “Patches”.

THE KON TIKI AS IT WAS BEING RESCUED AND NOW FLOATING SOMEWHERE OFF THE COAST OF CHILE

THE KON TIKI AS IT WAS BEING RESCUED AND NOW FLOATING SOMEWHERE OFF THE COAST OF CHILE

You may have heard that a recent “Kon Tiki-2” expedition from Peru to Easter Island with two balsa wood rafts that had planned to sail back to Chile was cut short, they say due to the El Nino weather pattern that was forcing them to far to the south.

The two crews a total of 14-persons were rescued by a ship that was diverted to their location, after a Chilean military plane had located them.

Now what concerns me is that these two rafts could very well end up on my return route as they are drifting north in the Humboldt Current. I believe they left locator beacons on the rafts so I possibly will have their positions so they can be avoided.
Now if they left any “Rum” onboard I would surely go find them. Does anyone have a list of provisions?

Practicing my light to no air sailing skills, the Jefe’.

 

AROUND ALONE DAY 136-137-138

THE ADVENTUROUS STORY:

DAY-136 24 hr. Run=99nm.

Pos. Lat.45*30’S Long. 176*30’W. Weather= Wind=8-12 kts. W. Seas=4-6 ft.

Cabin Temp=60*69* Bar=1010mb

Today was good sailing in sun shine, although rain is expected overnight, so possibly I can collect some much needed water.
Yesterday while replacing the failed hose clamp on the wind vane that was holding the two washer half in place that insured a good mesh to the gears, I noticed many goose neck barnacles attached to the stern of the boat and decided it was time to try and scrape the bottom where I could reach. I went to get the boat hook that I had planned to attach my scraper to, and decided to look over the side to see what kind of a job was ahead of me.

I could not believe it! there were absolutely no barnacles on the sides and the bottom paint appeared clean. Yahoo!!.  So I left the barnacles on the stern for now as I have too much to do already with “Patches” getting nearly 8-hrs. of my day already.

While on deck I noticed a pod of approximately-30 dolphins circling a school of fish and going after them. The dolphins were perhaps the largest fattest ones I have ever seen, looking like small killer whales

DAY-137 24 hr. Run=105nm.

Pos. Lat.44*31’S. Long.174*51’W. Weather=Wind 3-25kts. E-SE-S.= Seas8-10 ft. S.

Cabin Temp=59*-62* Bar=1012mb

The winds were light overnight, then picked up to 25 kts about daylight, and Sailors Run was happily bounding across the Pacific once again.
Today I sewed for 7- hours on “Patches” and was able to complete 18 inches of the 18ft 6 inch tear, I actually think I’m getting faster.
It started a steady rain in the morning and I got up on deck and was able to collect 15-20 gallons of water.
I have been being Jefe’ the “chef”, and made up some chicken spaghetti, and was amazed how much noodles I ended up with. I had a good lot of it for dinner and still had enough for the other 3-days. I put the leftovers in the refrigerator “that doesn’t work”, and at least that made me feel better about saving it.

Tonight was the fourth night of the well fermented spaghetti and I noticed it was mostly noodles so added a can of mixed vegetables and a can of tuna and walla!! we were back in business. I know I must be making you very hungry and I’m “so-so sorry”.

Today we passed 40 nm. South of Chatham Islands a group of Islands claimed by New Zealand, where only two of the 12-islands are inhabited, and do to the windy rainy weather there, the population is only about 200 people.

THE CHATHAM ISLANDS EAST OF NEW ZEALAND

THE CHATHAM ISLANDS EAST OF NEW ZEALAND

BOATS AT CHATHAM ISLANDS

BOATS AT CHATHAM ISLANDS

DAY-138 24hr Run=117nm.

Pos. Lat.44822’s. Long.172*15’W. Weather=Wind=SE-SW 10-15 kts. Seas=6-8 ft.

Cabin Temp=58*-62* Bar=1015mb

Last night I chatted with a Kiwi fisherman by the name of Rex on the Thomas Harrison a very large commercial fishing boat. We were passing like two ships in the night within 6 nm  of each other and he gave me a call on the VHF radio. He explained it had been a long time since he had seen any boats out here and was curious about where I might be headed, well as you can imagine he got very interested in the voyage as I shared with him.
I asked him how the fishing was and he said it was great, as the New Zealand fishery does a fine job of managing the resource. He also said to keep a look out for a very large Sperm Whale that hangs out in the waters we were passing through. He had seen him many times over the last thirty years of fishing, and he said the sperm whale is after the same kind of fish he is fishing for.
It was some time later after getting off the radio that I wondered to myself how does the giant Sperm Whale catch the fish, “by sneaking up on them”???

Out sailing and making new acquaintances, in the remote Southern Ocean, the Jefe’.

TRAWLER "THOMAS HARRISON" WHOM JEFF HAS BEEN SPEAKING TO

TRAWLER “THOMAS HARRISON” WHOM JEFF HAS BEEN SPEAKING TO

Total Miles sailed so far=18,028 nm.

Total miles sailed last three days =321nm.

Total miles to go to turn North=3518nm.

Top speed so far=14.1kts.

 

AROUND ALONE DAYS 133-134-135

Just the two of us on our great friends sailboat-ASTOR

Just the two of us on our
great friends sailboat-ASTOR

Total Miles sailed so far=17,707 nm.
Miles sailed last 3-days=189 nm.
Miles to go to turn to the north=3685 nm.
Top speed so far =14.1 knots
Day-133 24hr Run=57 nm. Pos. Lat.44*22’S. Long.178*36’E. Weather= Bar=1022mb. Wind =0-10kts S-N. Seas=6-8ft.S. Cabin Temp=54-58*.

Day-134 24hr.Run=46nm. Pos. Lat.44*52’S. Long.179*16’E. Weather= Bar=1020mb. Wind=0-5kts. E. Seas=4-6ft..S. Cabin Temp=57-60*.

Day-135 24hr. Run=86nm. Pos. Lat.45*36’S. Long179* 00′ W.
Weather= Bar=1014mb.. Wind=5-12kts. E-NE. Seas=4-6ft. S. Cabin Temp=58*-65*.
THE REST OF THE STORY:

DAY-133.
Today there is very little going on, as we are becalmed for 12 hrs and the wind are very light, when they do show up. The high has come up on us and centered on top of us. I just can’t seem to win, when I go north to get away from the storms I get becalmed and force myself back to the south in search of stronger winds.
We are still unable to reach the Date Line at 180*.
And I sewed on “Patches” for another eight hours.

DAY-134.
Today is sunny and good weather for drying out clothes, but the winds are to light to allow the wind vane to steer. I spend my day up and down from sewing getting the boat back on course, something I did at least 30-times with little results. “Patches” got 8-hours of my time once again.

DAY-135
Today Sailors Run passed another mile stone crossing Longitude 180* and back into the Western Hemisphere. “Yahooooo!!!”  This happened after 134-days and 14 hrs. at sea.
Now I will be counting down the longitude to the 85* where we make the turn North For Bahia Caraquez, Ecuador, at 400nm off the coast of Chile.

180 hemisphere

Today “Patches got yet another 8hrs of me and I’m happy to report that I’m working on the last tear about 18.5 feet long. This all requires 7-rows of zig-zag stitches by hand.
It seems I have little time for much else now, and please understand why I might not respond to an email.
I did get a much needed shower today and that always does a lot to brighten my spirits.

Making it right with “Patches” the Jefe’.

AROUND ALONE DAYS 130-131-132

DAY- 130 24 hr Run=123 nm.

Position:  Lat.45*53’S.Long. 173* 25’E. Weather: Wind=WNW- 12-25kts.Seas=6-8ft.

Cabin Temp=55*-62*. Bar=1012mb

DAY-131 24hr. Run=125nm.

Position:  Lat.46*10’S. Long.176*21’E. Weather: Wind=WNW-10-20kts.Seas=WNW. 8-10ft.

Cabin Temp=56*-62*. Bar=999mb

DAY-132 24hr.Run=110nm.

Position:  Lat.45*11′ Long.177*37’E. Weather: Wind=SW-20-50kts. Seas=15-20+ft.

Cabin Temp=55*-59*. Bar=1020mb

Total miles sailed so far=17,518nm.

Miles sailed last three days=358nm.

Distance left to go to date line =70nm.

Top Speed so far= 14.1kts.

THE REST OF THE STORY:

DAY-130.
Great sailing day with lots of sunshine, as we try to get north hoping to avoid the worst of a low that is headed our way.
I spend the day pumping bilges and applying chafe protection where needed, and look for anything that might need attention before the winds hit, oh yes and of course sew on “Patches”.

The local VHF Radio has been putting out storm warnings every two hours all day long, with predictions of 60 knots on both ends of New Zealand, and I’m very happy to be off the south end at this time.

Darkness comes and I feel a certain sense of anxiety, possibly because we have had to deal with so much severe weather during this voyage, that I wonder if our luck can keep holding out.
This one looks to be bad because there is going to be a 4-meter swell from the NW and the main punch will be a SW swell of five-meters, and that spells amazing rough seas ahead.[washing machine seas].

Day-131.
Still waiting, yet still not much going on and I start to question the weather forecast.
More sewing on “Patches”
Now we are running up against shortages on Sailors Run and today a really significant one occurred, as I spliced the “main brace” for the final time, as the rum stores are now completely depleted.

Does anyone out there have a set of plans for a still?

Day-132.
It was just two hours into this day, and the storm force winds hit, and here it is night time.

We had been sailing along comfortably with mizzen and staysail when 50kts of wind pounced upon us.

I scrambled out of my berth and suited up as fast as possible. Once out on deck the fury of the screeching winds and driving ran quickly set the tone for things to come.

I pulled the wildly flapping mizzen sail down, and in the process somehow the mizzen boom popped free of its goose neck and flailed around precariously wanting to do damage to someone or something. Fortunately, I had a mast step folded out and the boom came to rest on that and by tightening the mizzen sheet it stayed secured there pinned to the step. The sail found its way down out of the mast and was thrashing about; at long last I was able to wrap the sail around the boom and lash it down there.

Now I crept forward to drop the stay sail before it self-destructed and it came down with little trouble and was soon lashed down on deck.
We sailed on “bare Poles” driven to the north for the next seven hours, it was then with rapidly growing waves I decided to put out the drogue. It was while deploying the drogue that a large breaking wave filled the cockpit and drenched me to the skin once again, not so much different than the driving rain when I took the sails down.
Now I have a bit of a problem as I have no dry warm clothing left except a scarf to wrap around my neck a jacket that I call my sleeping jacket that never goes top side and two dry stocking hats. I know because some of my gear is wool it will keep me warm even though damp, and by sleeping in this gear all wrapped up in blankets it will eventually get almost dry.

After 11 hours under bare poles the winds begin to drop down and I haul the drogue in that has been out for the past 4-hours.
Now once again the staysail and mizzen are back up in 25-30kts and we are headed for the date line.

Still out here, and still going, the Jefe’.

 

AROUND ALONE DAYS-127-128-129

 

Total Miles sailed so far=17,160 NM.

Miles sailed last three days=416 NM.

Distance to go to date line= 450 NM.

Top speed so far 14.1 Kts.

THE REST OF THE STORY

DAY 127= 24 hr.Run=135 NM.

Position: Lat.47* 44′ S. Long.165*03’E. Weather: Wind=N 12-25 kts  Seas=N 6-12ft.

Cabin Temp 68*-54*. Bar=1010mb

Today we are closing on New Zealand, and New Zealand is called the land of the great white cloud, and lo and behold I saw the cloud but New Zealand itself remained invisible.

THE LAND OF THE LONG WHITE CLOUD THAT THEY SAW

THE LAND OF THE LONG WHITE CLOUD THAT THEY SAW

I got on the SSB this am at 1900 U.T.C. and talked to Ed on SV AKA, the net controller filling in for Jim Bandy who is in Fiji, until he gets his new radio and generator going after cyclone “Winston”’ a Cat-5.  Ed was the first human being I had spoken to in 127 days, and that was really strange. The frequency is 8173.0 USB.

Debbie and I would like to put a shout out to our many great New Zealand friends as well as our friends from all over the world that are cruising or now living there. Good on ya Mates!

DAY 128= OUR 5TH AND LAST CAPE -YAHOO!!   24hr. Run=126 NM.

Position: Lat.47*02’S Long. 168*10E. Weather: Wind=N 8-30kts. Seas. N 6-10ft.

Cabin Temp=58-60*. Bar=999mb

A BIG WIDE SMILEY FACE AT  WEST CAPE,NEW ZEALAND AS THEY SAILED BY

A BIG WIDE SMILEY FACE AT WEST CAPE,NEW ZEALAND AS THEY SAILED BY

Today is a Monumental Day of the Voyage, as Sailors Run pulls abeam of West Cape New Zealand after 127-days 11 hours and 55 minutes.

This being our 5th and FINAL CAPE and now I must say, “Debbie I’m coming home” keep a light on.

As we came in under the Cape we were about 8-miles north of the Snare Islands and I could actually see them. The first land I have seen since Cape Horn and I must admit although there not so large they were green and looked pretty inviting for this sailor in off of the “blue”.

SNARE ISLAND THE FARTHEST SOUTH OF STEWART ISLAND WHERE THEY SAILED BY

SNARE ISLAND THE FARTHEST SOUTH OF STEWART ISLAND WHERE THEY SAILED BY

LAND OF SNARE ISLAND

LAND OF SNARE ISLAND

It is a rainy day here south of New Zealand and I want to thank all of you out there for your prayers and best wishes as I have arrived here in pretty good shape.

The Barometer soup is about to kick in and the next 5-days look like they will be rough, easing on Friday.As tonight as darkness fell, a front arrived out of the SE and I had 40-50kts. of wind and under stay sail alone I recorded a speed in excess of 13 knots

The main thing is now I can get into open ocean and fight it out with what’s coming.

One of the worst things is it’s going to blow like Hell from the NW then switch around to The SW where a big swell is being created by a low that is coming up over New Zealand and pushing up against the high creating a squash zone that will intensify the winds in the area.

I suspect there will be 45-50kts with extremely rough seas and this is at its worst on Thursday.
I’m currently shooting north in 35 kts under staysail alone trying to avoid the worst of the low that is coming. ‘Only Time will tell”, how this all works out.
DAY 129-  24hr.Run=155 NM.

Pos. Lat.46*31’S. Long.170*57’E. Weather Wind=NW. 15-40kts. Seas=WNW-8-15ft.

Cabin Temp=56*-59*.Bar=1012 mb.

Today is windy and a sunny day as we reach to the north. The winds are starting to die down as this day progresses, but that will be short lived as that Nor wester should fill in by morning.

Early this am I had one wave break on Sailors Run and I got a small amount of water below through any breach it could find or create.
I now have over 50 hours of hand work into repairing “Patches” and still much more to go.

I just love the thoughtfulness of many of you out there, I even had one caring person offer to bring me food if I needed it since I was so close to New Zealand, and I truly appreciate the thought, but as you know the rules say (Unassisted,) which means no such help, but it sure felt great to know how much people are willing to do to keep Sailors Run and Crew going.
Getting “Battle Ready” for what’s coming!! The Jefe’.

 

 

DAY 128=5TH &FINAL AT WEST CAPE,NEW ZEALAND

THE BIG YELLOW WIDE SMILE FACE ON THE RIGHT IS WHERE WEST CAPE,NEW ZEALAND IS AS THEY SAILED BY

THE BIG YELLOW WIDE SMILE FACE ON THE RIGHT IS WHERE WEST CAPE,NEW ZEALAND IS AS THEY SAILED BY

MADE IT TO OUR 5 TH CAPE AS WELL AS THE LAST ONE ON MY ADVENTURE-YAHOO!!  

24 hr. Run=126 NM.

Position: Lat.47*02’S Long. 168*10 E. Weather: Wind=N 8-30 knots Seas. N 6-10 ft.

Cabin Temp=58-60*. Bar=999 mb

  TODAY IS A MONUMENTAL DAY OF THE VOYAGE,AS SAILORS RUN PULLS ABEAM OF WEST CAPE,NEW ZEALAND AFTER 127 days,11 hrs and 55 minutes.

THIS BEING OUR 5TH AND FINAL CAPE AND NOW I MUST SAY “DEBBIE I’AM COMING HOME” KEEP A LIGHT ON

AS WE CAME IN UNDER THE CAPE,WE WERE ABOUT 8-MILES NORTH OF THE SNARE ISLAND & I COULD ACTUALLY SEE THEM.

THIS BEING THE FIRST LAND I HAVE SEEN SINCE CAPE HORN & I MUST ADMIT ALTHOUGH THEY ARE NOT SO LARGE THEY WERE GREEN & LOOKED PRETTY INVITING FOR THIS SAILOR IN OFF OF THE “BLUE”.

SNARE ISLAND AS THEY SAW IT AS THEY SAILED BY

SNARE ISLAND AS THEY SAW IT AS THEY SAILED BY

AROUND ALONE DAYS 124,125,126

Showing Sailors Run & Jeff going to be  sailing by Stewart Island,New Zealand

Showing Sailors Run & Jeff going to be sailing by Stewart Island,New Zealand

Total Miles Sailed So Far=16,744 NM

Miles sailed last 3-days=267 NM.

Miles left to go to West Cape New Zealand =150 NM.

Top speed so far for trip= 14.1 kts.

THE REST OF THE STORY:

DAY-124= 24 hr.Run=69 NM.

Position: Lat.46*58’S. Long.158*01S. Weather=Wind: 0-15 kts. N Seas: 8-12 feet

Cabin Temp=56*-64*. Bar=1014mb

It was about midnight on a restless night aboard Sailors Run, and I was having trouble sleeping, as the air had become light and the sails were banging about top side, caused by the continual rolling on the seas.

I had finally had enough and rolled out of my bunk, dragging the spinnaker out from under the chart table and wrestling it up the companionway stairs and out over the top of the three storm boards into the cockpit; now that “will get” your heart pumping.
This spinnaker is a very large one which is off a Gulf Star 50 that my son owned and he had given it to me, knowing I needed one. Plus, it was brand new.
Debbie and I had had it cut down in Argentina to fit the Sailors Run. The sail is amazingly powerful with very broad shoulders, and will move Sailors Run at 5-6kts in 10-knots of breeze.
I launch the spinnaker and soon we are moving at near 3-knots and the wind vane is able to just barely steer with a little help from the mizzen trim.
I finally crash out below and dream of the spinnaker wrapping itself tightly around the forestay, and me aloft in the boson chair “franticly” slashing away at it with a butcher knife trying to cut it in the clear.
We sailed under Spinnaker for 9-hours before the winds increased to 15-knots and it was time to snuff the spinnaker, no easy feat for sure.
Once up on the fore deck I clip in after having already releasing the spinnaker sheet line and start the tug a war to bring the sock down over the “wildly popping and snapping” spinnaker.
Only by standing up on the foredeck and taking three wraps around my hand and falling back using all my weight and ending up laying on the deck do I at last get this monster contained in the snuffer once again.
I must “admit” it is times like this that you wonder if flying a spinnaker is the best idea for the solo sailor.

Day-125 =24 hr.Run=73 NM.

Position:Lat.47*10’S. Long.159*42’E. Weather=Wind: 0-12 kts. from all directions.

Seas: 4-8 feet N. Cabin Temp=58*63*. Bar=1010mb

Today was a light air day once again and we were becalmed [no wind] for 8-hrs. At last we are moving along with a favorable breeze that filled in from the north.

It is times like this that I get a little nervous lingering in an area of notoriously bad weather and having to struggle to get out of here. If I was not sailing unassisted around the world I would have that motor on and scooting out of here, but that is not what this voyage is about.
Today I sewed on “Patches” for 7- hrs. Then I got my weekly shower, something that really makes me feel so much better.  I have eaten up the last of the potatoes although I do have some instant mashed potatoes, and tonight it will be a can of “Chunky clam chowder” and a can of corn for dinner.

Day-12= 24 hr. Run=125 NM.

Position: Lat.47*10’S. Long.162*22’E. Weather=Wind=N 8-25 kts. Seas:6-10 ft.

Cabin Temp=57*62* Bar=1007 mb

So far for us the weather looks great for getting around West Cape New Zealand, although possibly a little light at times.

I put in yet another 8-hrs sewing on “Patches”, and there is still no end in sight to this project. All of this hand work truly “sucks and blows”, oh wait a minute, possibly just possibly I have defined the “sex life of the single hander”!
Wait a minute, now getting back to the sewing; I think the fingers on my left hand have more needle holes in them than a Bears paw stealing Honey from a bee’s nest.

Now practicing the 3-SSS’s-Sun-Sailing and Sewing.
The Jefe’

 

AROUND ALONE DAYS 121-122-123

 

Why a ship is called a sheTotal miles sailed so far=16,477 NM.

Miles sailed last 3-days=326 NM.

Distance left to go to East Cape, New Zealand=445 NM.

Top Speed so far= 14.1kts.

THE REST OF THE STORY:
DAY-121= 24hr.Run=78 NM.

Pos. Lat.45*41’S. Long.150*58’E. Weather=Wind=5-15kts. from all directions. Seas=8-15ft. S. Cabin Temp=58*-65*. Bar=1020mb

Have you ever had one of those days you just wished you had just stayed in bed?

For me it was day #121.
This day was dominated by light winds out of the SE, the direction we needed to go.
I consider myself a pretty good sailor, but in my life on several occasions I have found myself not being able to get there from where I was under sail.

This night the air was light on the nose with a 15 ft southerly swell with some current against us. I have no Genoa to put up yet, and the main boom is broken. With the wind vane I need about 7kts of wind for it to perform and we have 5. The only two directions it seems I can go is either NE or NW and I want to go SE. The wind will eventually fill in from the north, but in the meantime I’m going the wrong way.
I took the helm and if I was really careful I could go SW-SSW which was better than nothing, but it was now dark and I needed to sleep. It seems after about an hour of experimenting with different sail trim and adjustments on the Monitor wind vane I at last was able to get the boat sailing itself to the SW, and knowing the wind was going to fill in from the North I could at last get some sleep.

It finally got light and I decided today I would pull “Patches” [the genoa] down for repairs. I grab a quick cold cereal breakfast and then set about gathering up what I needed to patch the sail. Once up on deck I noticed the sheet line to the staysail was failing as it was down to the center core.

Now I must pull everything out of aft compartment, the 60lb CQR Anchor, 1000 feet of line, and miscellaneous other apparatus, to get the much needed replacement sheet line. I replace it and reverse the other one as it seems in the past storms it chafes on the forward lower shroud on the main mast.
I get the caulking gun with silicone and suddenly here this POP and there goes the main, as the main sheet had parted and the 4-inch block that is attached to the clew is flying wildly about. This is an easy fix as I have plenty of main sheet and only lost about 7ft of it.
At last I roll out “Patches” and get her down on the deck. I’m pleasantly surprised to see that she only has the one rip in the sail not like usual where I find 2-5 more once it’s down.
Soon the patch is back on and I begin to feed the sail into the furler foil, this is not easy single handed, and after about 6 trips to the foil and back to the mast, I have the sail about half way up. I pull more slack and line up the luff cord so it will enter the foil once again and go back to the mast and start to crank it up, when suddenly a gust of wind about 15 knots hits us, and blows the sail off the deck and over the side.

At first I’m not too concerned as I believe there isn’t enough sail to even reach the water, but much to my surprise we roll to starboard as a 15foot swell is coming through and patches scoops up a ton of water and disintegrates right before my eyes.

I mean she tears all along the foot just above the UV cover of the sail, and up the leach of the sail, she blows a seam in the middle of the sail and another section just rips from foot to leach,so I drag the pieces aboard and look at the tatters and the bottom paint all over it, and for an instant I can see me throwing the whole “damn thing” over the side.

No! I can’t throw the sail away, so now I have about 60 feet of repair work to do on the sail. This might take a week, but we can do it, so why not?

DAY-122 =24hr.Run=121 NM

Pos. Lat.46*23’S. Long. 153*43’E. Weather=Wind=N 12-20kts. Seas=6-12 ft N

Cabin Temp=58*-67*. Bar=1012mb

Today Sailors Run is sailing along nicely on course for West Cape New Zealand. I spent over 8 hrs sewing on patches making some progress. Today was also the warmest day I have seen in the Southern Ocean 67*.
I have a very interesting study going on with various types of mold found aboard, and have come to realize there are some major differences.

Now take the green mold that grows on the cheese and 4-month old bread, this mold has kind of a sharp bite to it, like extra sharp cheddar cheese, but let me tell you it is nothing compared to the black mold that was lurking in the bottom of my oatmeal box.

I took a bite of my charcoal colored oatmeal and “Holy Damn” that was a “Wild Assed” taste. I was spitting that stuff out and could not get that taste out of my mouth and throat. It was after about 15- minutes my lips started feeling numb and my face started to tingle. My hands even felt tingly, I was starting to get worried. I had already chucked the oatmeal overboard and had eaten a bowl of cold cereal, thinking that would absorb whatever little bit of this that went down my throat, but it seemed to be getting worse. I finally made myself a cup of lime juice and put a couple of shots of rum in it and guzzled that down and remarkably that seemed to make me feel much better. I don’t know what to say except to hell with that “waste not want not”, program I had going.

DAY-123=24hr Run=127 NM.

Pos. Lat.47*11’S. Long.156*30’E. Weather= Wind=N. 8-25kts. Seas=N 8-12 ft.

Cabin Temp=57*-63*= Bar=1005mb

Sailing along nicely today, and spent another 10hrs working on “Patches”. We did get some rain as some of the remnants of the cyclone Winston, that had hit Fiji drifted our way.
Other than that, mostly just pretty tired.
Just hanging in there the Jefe’

 

AROUND ALONE DAYS 118-119-120

SHOWING THE 4 CAPES AS I TRACK SAILORS RUN & JEFF ON MY WORLD MAP (IN BLUE)

SHOWING THE 4 CAPES AS I TRACK SAILORS RUN & JEFF ON MY WORLD MAP (IN BLUE)

Total miles sailed so far=16,151 NM.
Miles sailed last three days=368 NM.
Miles left to sail to East Cape New Zealand=735NM.
Top speed so far =14.1kts.

THE REST OF THE STORY:

DAY-118.
24hr.Run=96NM. Pos. Lat.46*04’S. Long.144*23’E. Weather=Wind=45-60kts WNW. Seas=15-30ft.WNW. Cabin Temp=53*-60*.Bar=999mb

First let me say I shared some of this day in the last adventure, because I could and wanted you to know I was all right.

The winds screeched and howled throughout the night, and on many occasions Sailors Run was slammed by powerful breaking waves, but little water found its way below.

I rolled out of my berth at 3 am after riding to the drogue for 8-hrs, and decide to winch it in. Now I got to tell you this thing really bites into the sea and takes nearly an hour to get it back onboard.
I decide to remain under bare poles until the squalls subside a bit. Our run for this day was diminished because of the time under the drogue. It was very late in this day that the winds began to come down and the waves diminished at a much slower rate.

The only damage we sustained was the loss of a dozen eggs that were broken in the fridge, leaving me but three eggs left, and as it turned out these were also rotten so possibly they were all finished before the storm any way.

DAY-119.
24hr.Run=135NM.Pos. Lat.46*10’S.Long.147*23’E. Weather= Wind=30-45kts.SW. Seas12-20ft. SW. Cabin temp=56*-60*.Bar=1000mb

It appears today we will get a break from the severe weather with that severe weather returning once again tomorrow.

We find ourselves sailing along the bottom of Tasmania some 100+ miles to the south headed for the East Cape. It would appear that the Cape will not be reached on this day.

Late in the day the winds increase to 45 knots and very rough seas overnight, and we sail on under staysail alone.

DAY-120.
24hr.Run=137 NM. Pos. Lat.45*11’S, Long.150*10E. Weather= Wind=10-45kts. SW-S. Seas=10-18ft. Sw. Cabin Temp=53*-60.Bar=1016mb

After 119 days 4hrs and 11-minutes Sailors Run sails abeam of South East Cape Tasmania!!! “Yahoo” our FOURTH CAPE and now off to New Zealand, and Cape #5 about 850 NM to the ESE.

Tasmania is an Island State of Australia, where over 1/2 million people live. The Island nearly 100 mile’s square was first sited by the Dutch sailing captain Abel Tasman in 1642. He named the Island Van Diemen’s land after the prime minister of the Dutch East Indies whom he sailed for.
Tasman is believed to be the first European to site Australia, and it is also believed that the Aborigines had lived there for more than 40,000 years prior to that sighting.

I’m currently watching the barometer shoot up like it has a solid fuel booster rocket attached to it. This means we are approaching the high pressure that will eventually bring us northerly winds to take us SSE down around the high to get to New Zealand.
The 975 low that has been tormenting us over the past three days should move SE and away taking the bad weather with it.
Now I know there was another topic I was to explore but for some reason, possibly battle fatigue I can’t recall what it was.
Hmmm! 40,000 years ago, maybe we did all fall down from the “Milky Way”.
After that final Cape the Jefe’

 

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