All Posts by Jeff

AROUND ALONE DAYS 151-152-153

Day-151.24hr.Run=163nm. Pos: Lat.41*40’S. Long.150*14’W. Weather=Wind=W 12-18kts. Seas=6-8W. Cabin Temp=62*-67* Bar=1000mb

Day-152. 24hr Run=150 nm. Pos: Lat.41*54’S. Long.148*27’W. Weather=Wind=12-15 W. Seas=6-10ft W. Cabin Temp=60-65*. Bar=997mb

Day-153. 24hr.Run=152nm. Pos: Lat.41*22S. Long.145*48’W. Weather=Wind=20-40kts WNW. Seas= W 15-20ft. Cabin Temp=60-65*. Bar=1007mb

Total miles sailed so far=19,790nm.

Mile sailed last three days=465nm.

Miles left to sail until turning north=2553.

Top speed so far= 14.1kts.

THE REST OF THE STORY:

Day-151.
Once again “Sailors Run” is sailing fast along the course line.

There is a shallow spot in the ocean out here, about a day away along our course line. It was reported by the Vessel Sophia Christianson back in 1913, and is reported to be 30 ft. deep, and that seems strange as all the rest of the ocean in this area is three-miles deep. Oh well we will skirt by this one.

Debbie’s father passed away and Debbie was at the burial today, a very sad time for her. Debbie’s father had served in the US Air force in the special security squadron and could speak seven different languages. He was an all around good person and will be missed by those who knew him.

Temperatures are now quite pleasant aboard Sailors Run, and the Ecuadorian vegetable oil is almost  a liquid once again.

Day-152.
I awoke in the middle of the night to the sound of luffing sails, and we were about 60 * off course. I got my foul weather gear on and went top side.

I disconnected the wind vane and gave the wheel a spin and was shocked as I watched it spin like the wheel of fortune. Once again a steering cable has failed.
This sent a sense of fear through me as I have been unable to find the spare cables. You can only break these things so many times, and think they are going to reach far enough, to get them back together again.
The break was in the cable that had not failed last time, but the other cable was showing some broken strands where it attaches to the chain, and it also needed to be remade.
The repair took 8-hrs. In the end I had to drill out the chain to get a shackle to fit on to the end  to make up for lost wire. I also used my Makita cutting wheel to carefully cut the copper crimp off of the cable saving 4-inches of much needed cable length. These cables just barely went back on the quadrant, and if this should happen again, I will have to resort to the emergency tiller and make changes to the lines on the wind vane to be able to steer the boat.

Day-153.
Today not too much different from yesterday, as once again awakened by popping sails and off course.

I roll out of my berth and climb out into the cockpit to find out what the “HELL” is going on now.

It doesn’t take too long to discover the servo rudder on the wind vane has broken off now for the third time on this voyage, and is trailing in our wake behind the boat.

This will not be an easy fix, as the winds have risen to 30kts gusting 40 and the mizzen must be dropped as well as the small portion of “Patches” that is still flying rolled in on the furler.

Once that is completed we are now under stay sail alone and with 15-20 foot seas and heaving to is not a safe option as these seas are steep and some are breaking ,so I play with the balance of the boat and eventually get her sailing just a little down wind and she seems to nearly be sailing herself, allowing me to hang off the back of the boat and get the remaining piece of the breakaway tube out of the kick up hinge joint, where the servo rudder bolts into. I make up a new piece and bolt the servo rudder back into the hinge joint and after just 4-hrs of precarious goings on, we are being steered by the wind-vane once again, on course at good speed.

Dreaming of sitting with “Debbie” on a white sandy beach, under a sunbrella and sipping on an ice cold beer,

The Jefe’.

 

AROUND ALONE DAYS-148-149-150

SAILORS RUN,JEFF MOVING ALONG HEADING TO ECUADOR

SAILORS RUN,JEFF MOVING ALONG HEADING TO ECUADOR

Day-148 24hr Run=125 nm. Pos.-Lat.43*41’S. Long.156*00’W. Weather:Wind: E-12-15kts. Seas=6-8 ft. Cabin Temp=60-63* Bar=1010mb
Day-149 24 hr.Run=152 nm.Pos.-Lat.41*48’S. Long.155*09’W. Weather:Wind: E-SE-12-15 kts. Seas=6-8 ft. Cabin Temp=60-62* Bar=1006mb
Day-150 24 hr.Run:172 nm.Pos.-Lat.41*14’S. Long.152*30’W. Weather=Wind: S-12-17 kts Seas=S-6-8 ft. Cabin Temp=63-66* Bar=1002mb
Total miles sailed so far =19,326.

Total miles sailed last 3-days=449nm.

Miles left to go till turn north=2960nm.

Top speed so far =14.1kts.

THE REST OF THE STORY:

Day-148.
I awoke this am to Sailors Run moving along smoothly, and pretty much on course, but after I got up we had altered course and seemed to be going due north.
I go out on deck to ascertain what is happening, and realize we are surrounded by many micro wind systems, and to make it even worse “Patches has yet another 4-inch tear in her.
I feel like going below and looking in the mirror and asking my self is this really happening?
I decide “screw it” I’m going to have breakfast before tackling “Patches”.
After coffee and breakfast Patches is down on deck and I put on patch #44 and the sail goes back up quite smoothly.

Once we are sailing along at speed I decide to tack over as this course is almost due north, after the tack Sailors Run settles in on due south, and this is disappointing tacking through 180*, and it is obvious the seas on the nose and adverse current have virtually stopped all forward progress to the east.

I tack back to the north to get over the low that is to the NE of me. Once the sails are trimmed in I notice that “Patches now has an 18-inch tear in the middle of it, “Holy Shit” what next.

I refuse to bring the sail down again and the wind is rising, so I roll it in so that only 1/3rd is exposed and the tear is buried. I know this is hard on the sail, but at this point I just want to get some use out of It, and don’t care.

Day-149.
Today we are sailing fast and mostly to the north only making a little easting.
I have chosen to sail up alongside the low hoping to get a sling shot effect over the top of it in favorable winds.

Today at least there is no rain and I work below removing more mold from all surface areas, as God knows Debbie won’t want to be sleeping on no “moldy boat”.

My food supplies are dwindling as is my waist line. I have but two cereal breakfasts left and no more spam to go with the hot cakes to make my “Hawaiian” breakfast. I have but 6-packages of cookies left with four cookies in each one. The “propane” is a question mark and I just pray it makes it; “Sun Coffee ” anyone.
I soon will have to get creative with the breakfasts, like “Top Ramon” with a can of tuna and a can of vegetables in it as I have plenty of those ingredients and lots of canned fruit, as well as a piece of chocolate bar, for each of the remaining days.

Day-150.
“Wow” 5-months at sea and still 5000+ nautical miles to go.

We are now on top of the low and “hauling ass” in the right direction.

Our soon to be next big challenge is getting around the bottom of the very large South Pacific high as this can be tricky for three reasons:

First: It can move faster than we can,

Second: Often times there are lows embedded in its west side raising havoc with wind speed and directions.

Third: The Humboldt Current that runs up the coast of Chile can be a great asset or just plain dangerous should a high develop over the interior of Chile and then moves west onto the Pacific causing northern winds against this 2 knot current and square waves are formed in my path.

This only happens occasionally, and I pray we have a bit of good luck here.

Now that we are further north the world is a little fatter, and that is why our distance to the turn has decreased very little, but for now we are at least closer to Ecuador.

Somewhat traumatized by “Patches”, the Jefe”

 

THIS IS A T-SHIRT THEY GAVE US FOR WINNING THE BAJA HA HA RACE, WAS A SIZE EXTRA LG NOT SURE IF JEFF LOOKED LIKE THIS WHEN HE LEFT

THIS IS A T-SHIRT THEY GAVE US FOR WINNING THE BAJA HA HA RACE,
WAS A SIZE EXTRA LG
NOT SURE IF JEFF LOOKED LIKE THIS WHEN HE LEFT

 

THE SHIRT AFTER I ALTERED IT TO FIT JEFF & IMAGINE NOW HE IS SKINNIER THAN THIS LOOK

THE SHIRT AFTER I ALTERED IT TO FIT JEFF & IMAGINE NOW HE IS SKINNIER THAN THIS LOOK

AROUND ALONE DAY 145-146-147

DAY-145  24hr. Run=101nm. Pos. Lat.44*53’S Long. 161*01’W. Weather=Bar=1026mb. Wind=NE-N-8-15kts. Seas= N 4-6ft Cabin Temp=58*-63*.

DAY-146 24hr. Run=161nm.Pos. Lat.45*17S. Long.158*22’W. Weather=Bar=1018mb. Wind=N-NW. 12-15kts.Seas=4-6ft. NW. Cabin Temp=59*-62*.

DAY-147 24hr.Run=38nm. Pos. Lat.45*13’S. Long.157*00W.Weather= Bar=1013mb. Wind= WSW-5-8kts. Seas=W. 2-4ft. Cabin Temp=60-63*.

Total Miles sailed so far=18,877nm.

Miles sailed last three days=300nm.

Miles left to go before turning north=2,972nm.

Top speed so far= 14.1kts.

THE REST OF THE STORY:

DAY-145.
Sailing slow today, sailing as close to the wind as we can go and pounding into the waves.

I had decided that the weather was finally right to put “Patches” back up so wrestled the 50lb sail up the companion way steps, and attempted to bench press it through the narrow companion way opening.

After what seemed like way to long of a struggle, and ending up balancing the sail on my head while trying to get the sail clear of the edges where it was hanging up, I made that final all you can do bench press, and I mean this is like trying to bench press a “Buick”, as you are trying to lift the cabin top off the boat.

Finally at last out of “go-hetas”(push in Spanish), I let the sail fall back into the galley and regrouped. This time putting the sail in a sail bag and cranking it up with the mizzen halyard, and soon it was out in the cockpit.
It is then that the wind begins to pick up and I stuff “Patches” back down through the hatch where she had just emerged from. You see I’m not going to try and hoist this thing in a blow where once again it goes in the ocean.
I spent the rest of the morning wiping the surfaces of the galley down with vinegar to get rid of the mold that is taking up residence in my all too moist environment.

DAY-146.
We had sailed a good course through the night and the winds were now down and it was time to put “Patches” up before breakfast.
Once again it was a wrestling match getting the sail out of the boat and out around the mizzen rigging and finally up onto the fore deck.
I carefully begin razing the sail, checking countless times to be sure it was going in the foil correctly, and staying aboard  at the same time.

At last “Patches” was up and flying. After making fast the halyard I stepped around the staysail to admire my repair job. I almost “felt ill”, as I found myself looking at yet another 4-inch teat in “Patches”. The sail once again had to come down.
Once on deck the repair was easy and this time I used a product called “grab it” a Loctite product for gluing down flooring, as I’m running out of everything at this point.
Once again I start hauling the sail back up into the foil, it was about ¾ of the way up when the sail jammed in the foil as the sail had got in ahead of the 5mm luff line and I mean it was jammed.
I worked on it for over two hours and was still unable to pull it free, finally in desperation I got my exacto razor knife and was ready to try and cut it in the clear, not a good thing. I decided at the last minute to make one more attempt to get the feed alignment piece off, as on earlier attempts one of the screws would just not budge, but I had been spraying wd-40 on everything hoping something would loosen up and at last I got the feed unit off, and was able to pound it down the sail and free, and then with my vice grips I was able to tug the sail free of the foil it was jammed into.

After 7.5 hours ” Patches” was up and flying, and I could go drowned my “cotton mouth” in coffee and some much needed breakfast.
I had counted the patches on “Patches” and she now has 43 not counting the major big ones of the last big repair.

DAY-147.
Today slowly moving along the 45* of latitude in very light air, normally the highs would be above me and the lows to the south, but it seems some highs are south of me creating head winds, on the nose at times.
Having “Patches up there and no wind is like having a powerful motor with Dual 4-barrel carburetors and no gas.
Oh well, this is all part of sailing, never quite knowing what you will get from day to day.

The Jefe’ limping along the 45* South Latitude, in the not so “Roaring 40s”.

AROUND ALONE DAYS 142-143-144

DAY- 142 24 hr.Run=70 nm. Pos. Lat.44*56’S. Long.165*40’W. Weather=Bar=1020mb. Wind=SW-W 6-8 kts  Seas=2-4ft. Cabin Temp=60*-62*.

DAY-143 24hr.Run=111nm. Pos. Lat.44*23’S. Long.163*47’W. Weather=Bar=1021mb. Wind=NW 8-12kts. Seas=NW 4-6ft. Cabin Temp=60-64*.

DAY-144 24hr.Run=150nm. Pos. Lat.43*51’S. Long.162* 24’W. Weather= Bar=1023mb. Wind=S-E 8-15kt6s. Seas=6-8ft.

Total Miles sailed so far=18,577nm.

Miles sailed last three days=333nm.

Distance left to go till the turn north=3,224nm.

Top speed so far=14.1kts.

The Rest of the Story.

DAY-142
Today sailing in very light winds as the high pressure begins to move over us.
Of course I sewed on “Patches” for 7-hours and believe the end of this project is just a couple of days away.
I don’t know if Sailors Run will set any records, but I’m pretty sure we will have the record for the most patches ever put on a genoa underway by hand.

DAY-143.
Today sailing a little faster in still light air and of course “Patches” gets her 7-hrs.

I will mention at this time that there were two other boats that I know of, that were attempting solo circumnavigations via the 5-“Great Capes”, and neither attempt has been successful.

The first I heard about was a very brave lady Donna Lang sailing on a 28 ft. Southern Cross sailboat, and she had made it around four of the capes, but on her approach to Cape Horn she was knocked down twice in one hour and sustained damage to some of her equipment on board, and in view of the horrific weather taking place at “Cape Horn” she made a prudent judgment call and sailed north up the coast of South America to finish her circumnavigation via the Panama Canal, and back to the east coast where she started from.
The second vessel I heard about is a Fast-40 sailed by Joe Harris, who was attempting to break the 137-day world record, but had to put in twice for repairs, and the last time he had three to four feet of the bow of his boat that was delaminating and he has thrown in the towel.

So now just know that that the Jefe’ and his “war horse” Sailors Run”, are praying we make it to the finish line.

Debbie and I are very familiar with the Fast-40 as it was the boat that beat us in the 2010 Fernando De Noronha Regatta, the largest sailboat race in Brazil.

It was after he never got properly measured to compete in his own division that they dropped him into our division, a cruising boat division, and we had to race him straight up,”no handicap”.

We had to good friends from Argentina as crew, Hector and Patricia, and after 300nm the Fast-40 only beat us to the finish line by 40-minutes and we ended up coming second.

Day-144nm.
Today is a most welcome day for me as “Patches” is once again back in one Piece, and ready to fly after 23-days, and over 140 hours of hand sewing; my “war horse” Sailors Run” has her most powerful working sail ready to go back on the furler, when the wind conditions will allow it

Once I had “Patches” folded up and ready to go on deck, I pulled the bathroom scale out and jumped on it to see what was left of the “Jefe'”.

Well I weighed 155 lbs when I started this adventure and I’m now weighing in at a lean mean 138 lbs. This is the least I have weighed since the 5th-grade even when training for marathons my least weight was 139 lbs..
I might be on to something here and am thinking of starting Jefe’s off shore weight loss clinics, where you sail off shore for 30-days and only take enough provisions for 15-days.

Results will be guaranteed, but I know I don’t want to be the one guarding the ship’s stores.

These cruises could also be good for alcoholics, as when I ran out of “Rum” I never even missed it, and I think it has a lot to do with the fact that there just is no availability, that would cause one to even think about being tempted to have something to drink “Wow” we are learning so much cool stuff on this voyage.

Tonight I made up gravy with Kirkland canned chicken in it and poured that over a pile of instant mashed potatoes with a can of vegetables and ‘Walla’!! a great dinner was had.
I actually had left over for two more nights, so I put them in the refrigerator “that doesn’t work”.
“Scared Skinny” the Jefe’.

AROUND ALONE DAYS-139-140-141

ENJOYING THE LIGHT WIND SAILING

ENJOYING THE LIGHT WIND SAILING

THE STORY:

Total miles sailed so far=18,246.

Miles sailed the last three days=218nm.

Miles left to go to turn north=3,413.

Top speed so far=14.1 kts

DAY 139  24hr.Run=145nm. Pos. Lat.44*32’S. Long.169*16’W. Weather  Wind=10-18kts SW. Seas=6-10 ft. SW. Cabin Temp=57*-62*.Bar=1017mb.

Today is nice sailing in moderate winds.

I still have no sighting of the Sperm Whale as yet. The Sperm whale is different from most whales as it is not a filter feeder but is more carnivores and eats fish. It has also been known to attack sail boats and sink them after they had rammed into it by accident as the whale slept on the surface at night, and I guess that’s fair enough. I have never seen one and certainly would like to, especially if it were to be in my path, and before I hit it.

SHOWING WHAT A SPERM WHALE LOOKS LIKE AND HOW BIG IT IS, & NOT SURE IF JEFF WILL SEE IT

SHOWING WHAT A SPERM WHALE LOOKS LIKE AND HOW BIG IT IS, & NOT SURE IF JEFF WILL SEE IT

I have some concerns with the Monitor Wind Vane since it is the only thing between me and me having to hand steer the rest of the way back.
There seems to be excessive play in the shaft that the servo rudder is suspended from and swings back and forth on. Right now I’m just lubricating it regularly hoping to reduce the wear.
Of course I spent 7-hrs. sewing on “Patches”, oh well it makes the days fly by fast.

DAY-140 24hr. Run=43nm. Pos. Lat.43*53’S Long.167*59’W Weather= Wind=SE 0-10 kts. Seas=SW 4-6ft. Cabin Temp=59* 62*.Bar=1020mb.

Today I’m plagued by light SE winds that are forcing me more to the north and I need to get south to the 46* to stay in the wind.

After my normal 7-hrs. of sewing on Patches, I glued on 6-small patches with Hypalon Glue for patching the inflatable dinghy, and the glue seemed to work great, and I believe I will avoid future tears that would have come from these small holes that were developing.

I’m happy to report that I had my last green bread tuna sandwich today and discarded the remaining half loaf of 20-week old bread. Please don’t try this with organic bread as I’m sure you would need a jack hammer to tenderize it before eating after two weeks.

I AM ASSUMING THIS IS WHAT JEFF'S SANDWICH LOOKED LIKE WITH A BIT OF MOLD OR LOTS!!

I AM ASSUMING THIS IS WHAT JEFF’S SANDWICH LOOKED LIKE WITH A BIT OF MOLD OR LOTS!!

I’m a little concerned that my cholesterol level is possibly getting to low, as I have no red meat, chips, eggs or none of the good stuff left to eat. I’m thinking that I can possibly warm up, like a half a cup of lard each day and drink it with a little sugar and cinnamon and it might be like eating pie crust without the crust. “I just don’t know what to think about this”. Oh well don’t worry as I might just be feeling the side effects of the last “green tuna sandwich”.

Day-141 24hr.Run=30nm. Pos.Lat.44*13’S Long.167*18’W Weather= Wind=0-5 kts.SW. Seas=0-2ft.SW. Bar=1022mb.

Spent most of this day becalmed in “glassed off” seas, all the time working on “Patches”.

THE KON TIKI AS IT WAS BEING RESCUED AND NOW FLOATING SOMEWHERE OFF THE COAST OF CHILE

THE KON TIKI AS IT WAS BEING RESCUED AND NOW FLOATING SOMEWHERE OFF THE COAST OF CHILE

You may have heard that a recent “Kon Tiki-2” expedition from Peru to Easter Island with two balsa wood rafts that had planned to sail back to Chile was cut short, they say due to the El Nino weather pattern that was forcing them to far to the south.

The two crews a total of 14-persons were rescued by a ship that was diverted to their location, after a Chilean military plane had located them.

Now what concerns me is that these two rafts could very well end up on my return route as they are drifting north in the Humboldt Current. I believe they left locator beacons on the rafts so I possibly will have their positions so they can be avoided.
Now if they left any “Rum” onboard I would surely go find them. Does anyone have a list of provisions?

Practicing my light to no air sailing skills, the Jefe’.

 

AROUND ALONE DAY 136-137-138

THE ADVENTUROUS STORY:

DAY-136 24 hr. Run=99nm.

Pos. Lat.45*30’S Long. 176*30’W. Weather= Wind=8-12 kts. W. Seas=4-6 ft.

Cabin Temp=60*69* Bar=1010mb

Today was good sailing in sun shine, although rain is expected overnight, so possibly I can collect some much needed water.
Yesterday while replacing the failed hose clamp on the wind vane that was holding the two washer half in place that insured a good mesh to the gears, I noticed many goose neck barnacles attached to the stern of the boat and decided it was time to try and scrape the bottom where I could reach. I went to get the boat hook that I had planned to attach my scraper to, and decided to look over the side to see what kind of a job was ahead of me.

I could not believe it! there were absolutely no barnacles on the sides and the bottom paint appeared clean. Yahoo!!.  So I left the barnacles on the stern for now as I have too much to do already with “Patches” getting nearly 8-hrs. of my day already.

While on deck I noticed a pod of approximately-30 dolphins circling a school of fish and going after them. The dolphins were perhaps the largest fattest ones I have ever seen, looking like small killer whales

DAY-137 24 hr. Run=105nm.

Pos. Lat.44*31’S. Long.174*51’W. Weather=Wind 3-25kts. E-SE-S.= Seas8-10 ft. S.

Cabin Temp=59*-62* Bar=1012mb

The winds were light overnight, then picked up to 25 kts about daylight, and Sailors Run was happily bounding across the Pacific once again.
Today I sewed for 7- hours on “Patches” and was able to complete 18 inches of the 18ft 6 inch tear, I actually think I’m getting faster.
It started a steady rain in the morning and I got up on deck and was able to collect 15-20 gallons of water.
I have been being Jefe’ the “chef”, and made up some chicken spaghetti, and was amazed how much noodles I ended up with. I had a good lot of it for dinner and still had enough for the other 3-days. I put the leftovers in the refrigerator “that doesn’t work”, and at least that made me feel better about saving it.

Tonight was the fourth night of the well fermented spaghetti and I noticed it was mostly noodles so added a can of mixed vegetables and a can of tuna and walla!! we were back in business. I know I must be making you very hungry and I’m “so-so sorry”.

Today we passed 40 nm. South of Chatham Islands a group of Islands claimed by New Zealand, where only two of the 12-islands are inhabited, and do to the windy rainy weather there, the population is only about 200 people.

THE CHATHAM ISLANDS EAST OF NEW ZEALAND

THE CHATHAM ISLANDS EAST OF NEW ZEALAND

BOATS AT CHATHAM ISLANDS

BOATS AT CHATHAM ISLANDS

DAY-138 24hr Run=117nm.

Pos. Lat.44822’s. Long.172*15’W. Weather=Wind=SE-SW 10-15 kts. Seas=6-8 ft.

Cabin Temp=58*-62* Bar=1015mb

Last night I chatted with a Kiwi fisherman by the name of Rex on the Thomas Harrison a very large commercial fishing boat. We were passing like two ships in the night within 6 nm  of each other and he gave me a call on the VHF radio. He explained it had been a long time since he had seen any boats out here and was curious about where I might be headed, well as you can imagine he got very interested in the voyage as I shared with him.
I asked him how the fishing was and he said it was great, as the New Zealand fishery does a fine job of managing the resource. He also said to keep a look out for a very large Sperm Whale that hangs out in the waters we were passing through. He had seen him many times over the last thirty years of fishing, and he said the sperm whale is after the same kind of fish he is fishing for.
It was some time later after getting off the radio that I wondered to myself how does the giant Sperm Whale catch the fish, “by sneaking up on them”???

Out sailing and making new acquaintances, in the remote Southern Ocean, the Jefe’.

TRAWLER "THOMAS HARRISON" WHOM JEFF HAS BEEN SPEAKING TO

TRAWLER “THOMAS HARRISON” WHOM JEFF HAS BEEN SPEAKING TO

Total Miles sailed so far=18,028 nm.

Total miles sailed last three days =321nm.

Total miles to go to turn North=3518nm.

Top speed so far=14.1kts.

 

AROUND ALONE DAYS 133-134-135

Just the two of us on our great friends sailboat-ASTOR

Just the two of us on our
great friends sailboat-ASTOR

Total Miles sailed so far=17,707 nm.
Miles sailed last 3-days=189 nm.
Miles to go to turn to the north=3685 nm.
Top speed so far =14.1 knots
Day-133 24hr Run=57 nm. Pos. Lat.44*22’S. Long.178*36’E. Weather= Bar=1022mb. Wind =0-10kts S-N. Seas=6-8ft.S. Cabin Temp=54-58*.

Day-134 24hr.Run=46nm. Pos. Lat.44*52’S. Long.179*16’E. Weather= Bar=1020mb. Wind=0-5kts. E. Seas=4-6ft..S. Cabin Temp=57-60*.

Day-135 24hr. Run=86nm. Pos. Lat.45*36’S. Long179* 00′ W.
Weather= Bar=1014mb.. Wind=5-12kts. E-NE. Seas=4-6ft. S. Cabin Temp=58*-65*.
THE REST OF THE STORY:

DAY-133.
Today there is very little going on, as we are becalmed for 12 hrs and the wind are very light, when they do show up. The high has come up on us and centered on top of us. I just can’t seem to win, when I go north to get away from the storms I get becalmed and force myself back to the south in search of stronger winds.
We are still unable to reach the Date Line at 180*.
And I sewed on “Patches” for another eight hours.

DAY-134.
Today is sunny and good weather for drying out clothes, but the winds are to light to allow the wind vane to steer. I spend my day up and down from sewing getting the boat back on course, something I did at least 30-times with little results. “Patches” got 8-hours of my time once again.

DAY-135
Today Sailors Run passed another mile stone crossing Longitude 180* and back into the Western Hemisphere. “Yahooooo!!!”  This happened after 134-days and 14 hrs. at sea.
Now I will be counting down the longitude to the 85* where we make the turn North For Bahia Caraquez, Ecuador, at 400nm off the coast of Chile.

180 hemisphere

Today “Patches got yet another 8hrs of me and I’m happy to report that I’m working on the last tear about 18.5 feet long. This all requires 7-rows of zig-zag stitches by hand.
It seems I have little time for much else now, and please understand why I might not respond to an email.
I did get a much needed shower today and that always does a lot to brighten my spirits.

Making it right with “Patches” the Jefe’.

AROUND ALONE DAYS 130-131-132

DAY- 130 24 hr Run=123 nm.

Position:  Lat.45*53’S.Long. 173* 25’E. Weather: Wind=WNW- 12-25kts.Seas=6-8ft.

Cabin Temp=55*-62*. Bar=1012mb

DAY-131 24hr. Run=125nm.

Position:  Lat.46*10’S. Long.176*21’E. Weather: Wind=WNW-10-20kts.Seas=WNW. 8-10ft.

Cabin Temp=56*-62*. Bar=999mb

DAY-132 24hr.Run=110nm.

Position:  Lat.45*11′ Long.177*37’E. Weather: Wind=SW-20-50kts. Seas=15-20+ft.

Cabin Temp=55*-59*. Bar=1020mb

Total miles sailed so far=17,518nm.

Miles sailed last three days=358nm.

Distance left to go to date line =70nm.

Top Speed so far= 14.1kts.

THE REST OF THE STORY:

DAY-130.
Great sailing day with lots of sunshine, as we try to get north hoping to avoid the worst of a low that is headed our way.
I spend the day pumping bilges and applying chafe protection where needed, and look for anything that might need attention before the winds hit, oh yes and of course sew on “Patches”.

The local VHF Radio has been putting out storm warnings every two hours all day long, with predictions of 60 knots on both ends of New Zealand, and I’m very happy to be off the south end at this time.

Darkness comes and I feel a certain sense of anxiety, possibly because we have had to deal with so much severe weather during this voyage, that I wonder if our luck can keep holding out.
This one looks to be bad because there is going to be a 4-meter swell from the NW and the main punch will be a SW swell of five-meters, and that spells amazing rough seas ahead.[washing machine seas].

Day-131.
Still waiting, yet still not much going on and I start to question the weather forecast.
More sewing on “Patches”
Now we are running up against shortages on Sailors Run and today a really significant one occurred, as I spliced the “main brace” for the final time, as the rum stores are now completely depleted.

Does anyone out there have a set of plans for a still?

Day-132.
It was just two hours into this day, and the storm force winds hit, and here it is night time.

We had been sailing along comfortably with mizzen and staysail when 50kts of wind pounced upon us.

I scrambled out of my berth and suited up as fast as possible. Once out on deck the fury of the screeching winds and driving ran quickly set the tone for things to come.

I pulled the wildly flapping mizzen sail down, and in the process somehow the mizzen boom popped free of its goose neck and flailed around precariously wanting to do damage to someone or something. Fortunately, I had a mast step folded out and the boom came to rest on that and by tightening the mizzen sheet it stayed secured there pinned to the step. The sail found its way down out of the mast and was thrashing about; at long last I was able to wrap the sail around the boom and lash it down there.

Now I crept forward to drop the stay sail before it self-destructed and it came down with little trouble and was soon lashed down on deck.
We sailed on “bare Poles” driven to the north for the next seven hours, it was then with rapidly growing waves I decided to put out the drogue. It was while deploying the drogue that a large breaking wave filled the cockpit and drenched me to the skin once again, not so much different than the driving rain when I took the sails down.
Now I have a bit of a problem as I have no dry warm clothing left except a scarf to wrap around my neck a jacket that I call my sleeping jacket that never goes top side and two dry stocking hats. I know because some of my gear is wool it will keep me warm even though damp, and by sleeping in this gear all wrapped up in blankets it will eventually get almost dry.

After 11 hours under bare poles the winds begin to drop down and I haul the drogue in that has been out for the past 4-hours.
Now once again the staysail and mizzen are back up in 25-30kts and we are headed for the date line.

Still out here, and still going, the Jefe’.

 

AROUND ALONE DAYS-127-128-129

 

Total Miles sailed so far=17,160 NM.

Miles sailed last three days=416 NM.

Distance to go to date line= 450 NM.

Top speed so far 14.1 Kts.

THE REST OF THE STORY

DAY 127= 24 hr.Run=135 NM.

Position: Lat.47* 44′ S. Long.165*03’E. Weather: Wind=N 12-25 kts  Seas=N 6-12ft.

Cabin Temp 68*-54*. Bar=1010mb

Today we are closing on New Zealand, and New Zealand is called the land of the great white cloud, and lo and behold I saw the cloud but New Zealand itself remained invisible.

THE LAND OF THE LONG WHITE CLOUD THAT THEY SAW

THE LAND OF THE LONG WHITE CLOUD THAT THEY SAW

I got on the SSB this am at 1900 U.T.C. and talked to Ed on SV AKA, the net controller filling in for Jim Bandy who is in Fiji, until he gets his new radio and generator going after cyclone “Winston”’ a Cat-5.  Ed was the first human being I had spoken to in 127 days, and that was really strange. The frequency is 8173.0 USB.

Debbie and I would like to put a shout out to our many great New Zealand friends as well as our friends from all over the world that are cruising or now living there. Good on ya Mates!

DAY 128= OUR 5TH AND LAST CAPE -YAHOO!!   24hr. Run=126 NM.

Position: Lat.47*02’S Long. 168*10E. Weather: Wind=N 8-30kts. Seas. N 6-10ft.

Cabin Temp=58-60*. Bar=999mb

A BIG WIDE SMILEY FACE AT  WEST CAPE,NEW ZEALAND AS THEY SAILED BY

A BIG WIDE SMILEY FACE AT WEST CAPE,NEW ZEALAND AS THEY SAILED BY

Today is a Monumental Day of the Voyage, as Sailors Run pulls abeam of West Cape New Zealand after 127-days 11 hours and 55 minutes.

This being our 5th and FINAL CAPE and now I must say, “Debbie I’m coming home” keep a light on.

As we came in under the Cape we were about 8-miles north of the Snare Islands and I could actually see them. The first land I have seen since Cape Horn and I must admit although there not so large they were green and looked pretty inviting for this sailor in off of the “blue”.

SNARE ISLAND THE FARTHEST SOUTH OF STEWART ISLAND WHERE THEY SAILED BY

SNARE ISLAND THE FARTHEST SOUTH OF STEWART ISLAND WHERE THEY SAILED BY

LAND OF SNARE ISLAND

LAND OF SNARE ISLAND

It is a rainy day here south of New Zealand and I want to thank all of you out there for your prayers and best wishes as I have arrived here in pretty good shape.

The Barometer soup is about to kick in and the next 5-days look like they will be rough, easing on Friday.As tonight as darkness fell, a front arrived out of the SE and I had 40-50kts. of wind and under stay sail alone I recorded a speed in excess of 13 knots

The main thing is now I can get into open ocean and fight it out with what’s coming.

One of the worst things is it’s going to blow like Hell from the NW then switch around to The SW where a big swell is being created by a low that is coming up over New Zealand and pushing up against the high creating a squash zone that will intensify the winds in the area.

I suspect there will be 45-50kts with extremely rough seas and this is at its worst on Thursday.
I’m currently shooting north in 35 kts under staysail alone trying to avoid the worst of the low that is coming. ‘Only Time will tell”, how this all works out.
DAY 129-  24hr.Run=155 NM.

Pos. Lat.46*31’S. Long.170*57’E. Weather Wind=NW. 15-40kts. Seas=WNW-8-15ft.

Cabin Temp=56*-59*.Bar=1012 mb.

Today is windy and a sunny day as we reach to the north. The winds are starting to die down as this day progresses, but that will be short lived as that Nor wester should fill in by morning.

Early this am I had one wave break on Sailors Run and I got a small amount of water below through any breach it could find or create.
I now have over 50 hours of hand work into repairing “Patches” and still much more to go.

I just love the thoughtfulness of many of you out there, I even had one caring person offer to bring me food if I needed it since I was so close to New Zealand, and I truly appreciate the thought, but as you know the rules say (Unassisted,) which means no such help, but it sure felt great to know how much people are willing to do to keep Sailors Run and Crew going.
Getting “Battle Ready” for what’s coming!! The Jefe’.

 

 

DAY 128=5TH &FINAL AT WEST CAPE,NEW ZEALAND

THE BIG YELLOW WIDE SMILE FACE ON THE RIGHT IS WHERE WEST CAPE,NEW ZEALAND IS AS THEY SAILED BY

THE BIG YELLOW WIDE SMILE FACE ON THE RIGHT IS WHERE WEST CAPE,NEW ZEALAND IS AS THEY SAILED BY

MADE IT TO OUR 5 TH CAPE AS WELL AS THE LAST ONE ON MY ADVENTURE-YAHOO!!  

24 hr. Run=126 NM.

Position: Lat.47*02’S Long. 168*10 E. Weather: Wind=N 8-30 knots Seas. N 6-10 ft.

Cabin Temp=58-60*. Bar=999 mb

  TODAY IS A MONUMENTAL DAY OF THE VOYAGE,AS SAILORS RUN PULLS ABEAM OF WEST CAPE,NEW ZEALAND AFTER 127 days,11 hrs and 55 minutes.

THIS BEING OUR 5TH AND FINAL CAPE AND NOW I MUST SAY “DEBBIE I’AM COMING HOME” KEEP A LIGHT ON

AS WE CAME IN UNDER THE CAPE,WE WERE ABOUT 8-MILES NORTH OF THE SNARE ISLAND & I COULD ACTUALLY SEE THEM.

THIS BEING THE FIRST LAND I HAVE SEEN SINCE CAPE HORN & I MUST ADMIT ALTHOUGH THEY ARE NOT SO LARGE THEY WERE GREEN & LOOKED PRETTY INVITING FOR THIS SAILOR IN OFF OF THE “BLUE”.

SNARE ISLAND AS THEY SAW IT AS THEY SAILED BY

SNARE ISLAND AS THEY SAW IT AS THEY SAILED BY

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