All Posts by Jeff

AROUND ALONE DAYS 169,170,171

SAMSUNG CAMERA PICTURES

70th-birthday-wishes1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total miles sailed so far=21,831 nautical miles

Miles sailed last three days=323 nautical mile

Distance to go to Finish line off Bahia=2775 nautical miles

Top speed so far 14.1 knots

THE REST OF THE STORY:

DAY: 169= 24hr Run=06 nautical miles

Pos: 36*47’S. Long. 118*54′ W.; Weather=Wind=0-5 NW mostly becalmed.;Seas=4-6 feet

Cabin Temp=71*-73*; Bar=1010 millibars

THIS MORNING finds Sailors Run becalmed, and it starts to pour down rain.

I suit up and quickly get on deck plugging up scuppers to trap the rain. I scoop up the peddled water managing to get a much needed 15 gallons into the starboard tank. Obtaining this water lets me breathe a little easier, as now I possibly have enough to get to Bahia.

It appears that I have a 0.7 kt. counter current pushing us to the west, and we stay becalmed, for twenty hours before the winds start to fill in from the north. The end result is the worst day of the trip so far netting only 6 nm.

This very dismal performance was only slightly offset by the water I had collected, and at this rate it will take 503 more days to get to Bahia; Hmmmmmm!

I think this is when you are supposed to start off loading excess weight. Like in the old sailing days it was the horses that went. I can’t seem to find no “Damn” horses so must pray for wind as a “Birthday Gift” for tomorrow.
DAY: 170= 24hr.Run=161 nautical miles

Pos:  Lat.35*38′ S. long. 116*20’W; Weather= Wind =N 12-25kts ; Seas N 6-10 feet

Cabin Temp=73*-73*; Bar=1012 millibar

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME
Today is a mile stone in my life as I sail on into my 70th-year, and I did get my present of plenty of wind to sail with.
When I think of my age, and what I’m doing I have to reflect back upon my mentor “Clarence Plotts”.

I met Clarence while studying with the Tacoma Power Squadron, soaking up all I could about Navigation, Seamanship and Sailing. Clarence taught the sailing course, and he seen the keen interest I displayed for sailing.

Well one thing lead to another and I ended up racing with Clarence, aboard his beloved boat “Pinocchio” for three years and we “kicked ass”.

Clarence raced until he was 90-years old and at 92 I helped him Sail “Pinocchio to Seattle to put her up for sale.
I remember asking Clarence what he would do now, and he said, he was just about done, and wouldn’t last long. Clarence died on his 93rd birthday, but I can only assure you this, he was very much alive and lived life to the fullest for at least 92 of those years.

 

DAY: 171=24hr.Run=156 nautical miles

Pos: Lat.34* 46’S. Long. 114*00’W.; Weather=Wind= NNW 12-15 knots ; Seas=NNW 6-8ft

Cabin Temp=63*-64*. ; Bar=1013 millibar

DEBBIE & I are both devastated by the catastrophic damage caused by the 7.8-magnitude earth quake in Ecuador.

Our hearts and prayers go out to the Ecuadorian people in their struggle to survive, and start the rebuilding process.
We have many friends in Bahia, Caraquez and fortunately we believe they have all survived, but some are homeless living at the college with many other people from their area.
We are just gradually starting to get the picture as to the extent of the damage to homes, buildings and businesses where people might have been employed. Phone lines are down and power is out in many areas, and because the whole west coast is affected, recovery will be slow and resources to do so in short supply locally.
For me and the Sailors Run it feels much like being on a space mission where you are returning to earth and when you get back it somehow looks very different from when you left.

Debbie and I have not yet been able to make contact with Tripp, the Marina owner and are not even sure there is an open channel to reenter the river. We do know that Tripp, Maye & there daughter Franchy are okay and no doubt dealing with the disaster taking care of priorities.

So for now I sail on for Bahia, and by the time I arrive I will have “boots on the ground” Debbie. Who knows I might see her out there shoveling out the channel at low tide so I can get in.

We had hoped to leave the boat there and fly home, but were not for sure there is a there!

I will be out of food, water, and propane by then. Worst case I will have to provision off shore and sail for Peru or the Marquesas, as I don’t like the lightning in Panama or the Hurricanes off Mexico in the summer.

So, as for that big planned celebration, it doesn’t look real promising, but I’m sure like most things it will somehow all work out “just fine”.
“Hmmmmmm” which way to “steer, the Jefe’.

PICTURES ARE FROM LAST YR-2014

 

 

 

Tripp & Maye,owners of Puerto Amistad

Tripp & Maye,owners of Puerto Amistad

Debbie in front of Puerto Amistad,Bahia Caraquez, Ecuador

Debbie in front of Puerto Amistad,Bahia Caraquez, Ecuador

 

 

 

AROUND ALONE DAYS-166-167-168

Around Alone Days-166-167-168.

Total Miles sailed so far=21,508 nautical miles=  Miles sailed last 3-days=205 nautical miles

Distance left to go to finish line-3,032 nautical miles= Top speed so far=14.1 knots
THE REST OF THE STORY:

DAY-166 =24 hr.Run=43 nm. Position:Lat: 36*18’S. Long: 122*42’W.

Weather=Bar=1008 mb= Wind=2-25 kts NE. Seas=NE-4-6 ft Cabin Temp.=71*-71*

Today we went over on the port tack, that taking us to the SE, where hopefully winds from the low will allow us to sail to the east
I have eaten the last of the popcorn and drank my last cup of coco. I can substitute tea for the coco but there is nothing for the popcorn. The one good thing about me eating my way to the bottom of all our provisions, is that all the new stuff will be good for several years down the road.
The ocean is warming up around us and the warm moist air coming down from the tropics seems so thick you could cut it with a “knife”.

Debbie is packing her bags and in those bags will be our new refrigeration system and a few other goodies for the boat.
Now with just a little over 3000nm to go, all I have to do is sail a distance across the Pacific equal to the size of the United States.

DAY-167= 24 hr Run=63 nm. Position: Lat.36*27’S. Long.121*01’W.

Weather= Bar=1006mb. Wind=N-5-20kts. Seas=6-8 ft. Cabin Temp=73*75*

I’m currently closing in on my outward bound track, and should be crossing that tomorrow. The low that the weather info showed overtaking me, apparently has gone someplace else and hopefully the sailing will be much better than yesterday

It’s truly amazing how my cooking skills are coming along Take my gravy for instance, once I switched from using two cups of flour, to 2-tablespoons of flour, now the gravy just flows over whatever you put it on, whereas before you could have laid “bricks” with it.

Also making gravy in a frying pan is never a good idea when pounding to weather unless the stove and cabin sole need oiling. I now almost need “ski poles” to stay at the stove when healed over.

DAY-168= 24 hr.Run=99 nm. Pos: Lat.36*20′ S. Long.119*09’W.

Weather=Bar=1009mb. Wind=NNE-3-40+kts.Seas=8-18ft. Cabin Temp=73*-73*

Today winds are gusting over 40-kts and I have had to go to the staysail and run off for a while until winds settled back down.

***Today is another mile stone of the voyage as after 167-days and 8-hours we have crossed over our out bound route completing the loop around the globe***

Now it is just a matter of sailing to the Finish line of Bahia Caraquez,Ecuador and who knows how long that might take?

In search of “favorable winds” the Jefe’

 

 

AROUND ALONE ADVENTURE DAY 167-GOOD NEWS

         ARRRGH MATES!! GREAT NEWS ABOUT JEFF!

APRIL 15TH 2016

RECEIVED AN EMAIL ON DAY 167 THAT SAILORS RUN AND THE CAPTAIN HAVE
FINALLY TIED THE LOOP!   AT LATITUDE 36’27 S- LONGITUDE 121’01 W

RIGHT WHERE THE TWO BLUE LINES MEET AT WHAT LOOKS LIKE THE TOP OF A BEAR'S SNOUT WHERE ARROW  IS POINTING

RIGHT WHERE THE TWO BLUE LINES MEET AT WHAT LOOKS LIKE THE TOP OF A BEAR’S SNOUT WHERE ARROW IS POINTING

ALL THEY HAVE TO DO IS GET ENOUGH WIND TO KEEP ON THAT BLUE LINE TO THAT BIG  YELLOW SMILING   STICKER :) I KNOW,I KNOW,A SAILORS DREAM,BEEN THERE DONE THAT!!

ALL THEY HAVE TO DO IS GET ENOUGH WIND TO KEEP ON THAT BLUE LINE TO THAT BIG YELLOW SMILING STICKER 🙂
I KNOW,I KNOW,A SAILORS DREAM,BEEN THERE DONE THAT!!

(on picture,right where the arrows are pointing)

AROUND ALONE DAYS-163-164-165

Around Alone Days-163-164-165.

Day-163 24hr.Run=127nm.

Pos.Lat.38*18’S.Long.125*39’W. Weather=Wind=S-12-30kts.Seas=SW 10-13ft.

Cabin Temp=64*-69*. Bar=1002mb

Day-164 24hr.Run=123nm.

Pos. Lat.37*21’S. Long.123*59’W. Weather=Wind=SE 7-12kts. Seas=se 6-10ft.

Cabin Temp=65*-68*. Bar=1008mb
Day-165 24hr.Run=115nm.

Pos. Lat.35*48′. Long.123*59’W. Weather=Wind= E 7-20kts. Seas=E6-10ft.

Cabin Temp.68*-69*. Bar=1007mb

Total Miles sailed so far=21,303nm.

Miles sailed last 3-days=368nm.

Distance to go to finish line at Bahia Caraquez=3186nm.

Top speed so far=14.1kts

THE REST OF THE STORY:

DAY 163.
The barometer is rising, and soon  the winds begin coming down and many hours later, the seas also drop down, and I breathe a sigh of relief.
I put the mizzen back up and several hours later in 20-knots of breeze I hoist the mainsail back up to keep speed up.
Today is Sunday and I always run the engine for 15-minutes in neutral to circulate the oil and dry the moisture out of the engine.
When I go out in the cock pit to shut down engine I’m greeted by a strange, rather musical sound, like someone playing the comb with wax paper on it. I look over the stern at the exhaust water and there is just a trickle coming out and the exhaust without water is making the music. I immediately shut the engine down, and soon realize my mistake.
I share this with you as it might save you problems in the future. Since I was sailing well healed over and waves on the beam were rolling me even further over, at times I was sucking air instead of water into the engine thru hull fitting, and “smoked” the rubber impeller, on the raw water pump, that needs the water for cooling and lubrication.
I have never had this happen before but should have realized it could. Fortunately, I have spare impellers and it is an easy fix.

DAY-164.
We have a drought aboard Sailors Run, and now our reservoir is down to the last 15-gallons of water. We still have about three weeks to go and I might be able to make it. I still have the hand operated water maker that I have been advised not to use, because I will end up looking like “Popeye”.

Well that might not be so bad after all my “Hash Harrier”[runners group] name I was given in Samoa is “Popeye”.
There is yet another low that has formed NW of me and headed our way. This one I do believe will pass astern of us, but will impede our progress by hitting us with 25+Knot winds from the NE forcing us to the SE.

DAY-165.
Today I headed into what was going to be a very productive day.
First I replaced the impeller on the engine, and had a bit of trouble as my liquid gasket material in the tube had all set-up solid. So I made do by using the inflatable dingy glue for the gasket material and it seemed to have worked.
Next on my list was “Patches as I decided since it was a nice day to bring her down and do the three needed patches. This project went “side-ways” on me at the get go, as the halyard jammed in the mast where it entered because the outer jacket on the line had chafed through and bunched up causing the jam. The sail won’t come down without me going up in the boson chair and cutting away the excess jacket and taping the jacket down so it can inter the mast.
Since the last time I patched “Patches”, and put her up, only to see another two foot tear in just 15-minutes, I have a hard time going thru all that this repair will require; so for now it’s back to using “Patches at 10-15% rolled out. Possibly If I get stuck in the center of a high I will be more motivated.
I eased the strain off the chafed halyard, as the genoa is going nowhere most of the way rolled in.
I have changed our distance to go from the turn north to the finish line at Bahia. I still need to get east for weather reasons and will be trying to do that, but lately these lows have been forcing me north at times. It now comes down to a chess game where you try to anticipate the weathers next move so you can place your vessel in the right part of the ocean, and it can be very frustrating and sometimes very little forward progress is made.

” Ene meany miny moe”, what in the “Hell” way, should the Jefe’ go.

 

Around Alone Days-160-161-162

DAY-160 24hr Run=64 nm.Position:Lat.40*46’S.Long.130*12’W Weather=Wind=N 7-10kts. Seas=4-6ft. Cabin Temp=66*-68*. Bar=1010mb

DAY-161 24hr Run=87 nm Position:Lat.40829’s. Long.129*19’W Weather=Wind= N-NE. 5-40+kntos  Seas=N-NE 8-15 feet  Cabin Temp=66*-68*. Bar=989mb.Wind
DAY-162 24hr Run=142 nm Position:Lat.39*11’S.Long.127*30’W. Weather=Wind N-SW. 18-40+ knots  Seas SW 15-20 feet  Cabin Temp 64*-69* Bar=996mb
Total Miles sailed so far=20,938nm.
Miles sailed last 3-days=292nm.
Miles left to go to turn North=814nm.

THE REST OF THE STORY:

DAY-160.
Today is a cloudy day with light WNW winds, and early on, this day, the barometer remains steady at 1010 mb.
I’m waiting for the once fast moving low moving at 30kts. that is coming down from the NW, and it appears to be slowing down to 15kts. and passing just above me, or on top of me.

I must admit that this reminds me of when I was in the 6th grade and had shinned a kid while playing soccer during first recess, and he challenged me to a fight after school, and I had agreed to meet him in one corner of the field out behind the school.  Well, all day long I watched the clock and it must have been every half hour in my mind I fought this kid over and over again.
At last the final school bell rang and I and my buddy went to the far corner of the field to wait for the kid. Wouldn’t you know it he never showed up, which was alright with me, as it must have been with him, as he never looked me up again.

Now once again I find myself watching the clock and the barometer for the fight that is yet to come. I know I must tack to the north when the 30kt. East winds come, but for now it is a “waiting game”.

DAY-161.
The day of reckoning is upon us, as the winds steadily build and the barometer plunges towards the bottom.
It was just after dinner that my course started heading more to the south, and with the rising winds I decided to drop the main sail down.
I tacked over on to the starboard tack, now pounding to weather on a heading of 345* giving up progress to the east. The seas are rising now 10-12ft and Sailors Run Bashes head long into them.
(Sometimes I think an off shore cruising yacht should have a “Tums” dispenser both fore and aft.)
Now I wonder, have I tacked too soon giving up hard earned miles and how long will this continue.

After just 30-minutes the winds are blowing 30kts, and after one hour they are gusting over 40kts, and even though it is dark and time to sleep the Jefe’ gets none.
I squirm in my bunk the safest place in bad weather, and wonder by heading directly into this low what kind of “Pandora’s box” have I opened.

Sailors Run has been my “war horse” so many times on this voyage, and I feel my stomach muscles tense as she vaults of a huge wave and comes crashing down into the face of the next one; the mast shudders and the entire hull vibrates, and I wonder just how many times can she with stand this brutal punishment.

I question myself is there not something I can do to ease Sailors Run’s struggle. After two hours we are sailing due north and sometimes making 20-degrees of east actually gaining some ground, but at what seems like a huge risk of catastrophic failure, in the deteriorating circumstances.

I run through the abandon ship drill in my mind, May Day, Get out quick bag, Gumby suit(a full emersion suit),Deploy life raft.

It was after being launched off one particularly large wave where we grabbed a lot of air and crashed into the trough, slamming me down hard on my berth, and then sending a horrendous shuddering through the boat, that I finally said that’s it, and rolled out of my berth and suited up to go top side.
Once in the cock pit I hurriedly altered our course away from the wind and waves by about 10-degrees. I can’t fall off too much for fear of taking a large breaking wave on the beam and getting knocked down or worse, rolled all the way over.
Once safely below decks I check the barometer and it is now reading 990mb, and we are obviously beating through the squall filled outer wall of the low. I wonder how long it will take to reach the core of the low.

This all started about 6pm and at 2am suddenly the wind appears to have stopped and all is quiet below. I go top side to see what is going on and find that we are back winded in a moderate 17 kt breeze from the North. I trim the sails in as they should be and reset the wind-vane and we are now sailing almost due east in a nice breeze with confused seas that slam into us from all sorts of directions, but they are smaller seas, and Sailors Run takes them in stride.
We are now sailing inside the low, and the barometer is reading 986mb. The low is moving over us and I wonder how long before the back of the low’s wall will overtake us.
Soon I collapse into a deep sleep.

DAY-162.
After Four hours its 10am, and my eyes pop open, and I find we are sailing along nicely to the east and the barometer is still at 986mb.
Suddenly at 3pm our world changes, as the back wall strikes us, and the winds go to the SW30-40+kts and the mizzen comes down and we sail on a broad reach under staysail alone, hitting 7kts at times.
The seas are higher now reaching 20ft. this happens because in the Southern Ocean there is almost always a SW swell running 6-10ft, and when you apply 40kts of wind to those swells they grow rapidly into storm force waves.

Sailors Run’s cockpit is filled several times by waves breaking over the stern, and several rogue waves strike us on the beam forcing a small amount of water below decks at times.
When Sailors Run runs before these following seas it remains fairly comfortable below decks, and I can actually sleep “sometimes”.
Riding out the” blow” the Jefe’.

 

AROUND ALONE DAYS-157-158-159

JUST ABOUT WHERE SAILORS RUN AND JEFF ARE

JUST ABOUT WHERE SAILORS RUN AND JEFF ARE

Total miles sailed so far=20,645nm.
Miles sailed last three days=448nm.
Distance to go to turn North=978nm.

THE REST OF THE STORY:

DAY-157 24hr.Run=135nm.

Pos: Lat.42*06’S. Long.136*52’W. Weather: Wind=NE-N 7-15kts. Seas=N 6-8ft.

Cabin Temp.=65*-71*. Bar=1010

Today we started out with light winds that filled in late in the afternoon, and we are presently sailing fast.

Today I received a most welcome email from Debbie, where once again she has stepped up to be part of “Team Sailors Run” and agreed to yet another off shore passage. We will depart Bahia, Ecuador in early November sailing the “Clipper Route” to Barra De Navidad, Mexico, a passage of some 2100nm. and it should take about 17-days.

Now my immediate concerns, are the two lows that I must deal with here in the “Roaring 40s.

One is already bringing me NW winds that I will try to get the most easting out of as possible and slip a little to the north, trying to out run the second low that is gradually overtaking me and should hit by the 10th. This low is predicted to intensify rapidly and could end up right on top of us, pounding us with head winds to 40+kts. This is never a good feeling.
For now we just “Haul Ass” to the ENE and pray it drops in just behind us. You know what they say if you can’t run with the “Big Dogs”, you best just stay on the porch!

DAY-158 24hr.Run=173nm.

Pos: Lat.42*07’S. Long.134*06′ W. Weather: Wind=NW 12-15kts. Seas=NW 6-8ft.

Cabin Temp=65*-67* Bar=1011mb

Today finds us still sailing fast with warm winds from the NW. It’s so warm that I’m only wearing one set of long underwear on the bottom with shorts on top of them and double long underwear on top with a T-shirt.

I’m still eating pancakes every other day with fruit, and my special Top Ramon & tuna breakfast with fruit on the other days. There is no lunch, making that easy. Dinner is either, chicken, spaghetti and vegetables, or chicken, potatoes and vegetables, or rice, chicken and vegetables. I must admit my cooking skills are improving, as now the instant potatoes are coming out thicker than the gravy for a change.
I do still get a small piece of chocolate for a treat each day and for a little longer a cup of coco in the evenings.

Those of you, who have been following me by my “spot” locator, haven’t been getting a position lately as I’m in a remote part of the Pacific, where there is no spot coverage. I will however continue to set it out once a day until I hear from someone that it is being picked up once again, then will put it out twice a day after that. It should kick back in around 120* longitude.
DAY-159 24hr.Run=140.

Pos: Lat41*19’S. Long.131*52’W. Weather: Wind=WNW 7-15kts. Seas=WNW.6-8ft.

Cabin Temp=66*-71* Bar=1010mb

Winds today are westerly and much lighter.

Last night was another one of those nights where the sky looked like a “bowl of diamonds”.

It has been suggested to me by our good friends Cal & Elly formerly from the yacht “Desperado” that I should harvest the goose neck barnacles hanging on my stern, as they are considered a delicacy in Europe going for about 200-dollars a plate. They say they taste somewhere between clams and lobster. I’m thinking about doing it but have yet to devise a way to scrape them off and catch them at the same time. They are close to the water and possibly a dust pan might work

I’m still ahead of the low, but the winds are going light much like the calm before the “storm”.
“Running Scared Skinny” the Jefe

 

 

AROUND ALONE DAYS-154-155-156

THIS IS WHERE SAILORS RUN & JEFF IS,  RIGHT ABOVE THE "L"  ON THE WORD "WORLD" AND UP ABOVE IS BAHIA, ECUADOR BY THE BIG SUNGLASS SMILY FACE

THIS IS WHERE SAILORS RUN & JEFF IS,
RIGHT ABOVE THE “L” ON THE WORD “WORLD” AND UP ABOVE IS BAHIA, ECUADOR BY THE BIG SUNGLASS SMILY FACE

THE STORY:

Total Miles sailed so far=20,197nm.
Miles sailed last three days=407nm.
Distance to turn north=1,295nm.
Top speed so far=14.1kts.

DAY-154 24hr.Run=109nm.

Position:  Lat.40*53’S. Long.143*55′ W.

Weather= Wind=WNW 7-20kts. Seas=6-10ft. Cabin Temp=62*-65*. Bar=1003mb

Today the sailing was primarily under light winds.

I came across a fleet of commercial fishing boats and was contacted by Paul aboard ” Seven Daughters” registered out of Haines,Alaska. They were fishing for Albacore Tuna, and Paul reported the fishing was slow yet slightly better than last year. He said once they get 600 fish they head for Tahiti for fuel then up to Vancouver Canada where they spend the off season.

On this night the sky was so clear that it looked like you could stand on deck, and pick the stars out of the heavens above.

Fishing Vessel Seven daughters Jeff was talking to

Fishing Vessel Seven daughters Jeff was talking to

DAY-155 24hr.Run=122nm.

Position: Lat.41*25’S Long.141*57’W.

Weather=Wind=WNW 8-15kts. Seas=WNW6-8ft. Cabin Temp=62*-66*. Bar=1000mb.

Today I find myself studying the pilot charts, as I have become somewhat apprehensive about my planned point where I intended to turn north. The reason being I’m later getting here, later than I had hoped and the fall weather can be pretty unpredictable at 45* south and the 85* west.

I also must admit that I’m suffering a bit from “Battle Fatigue”, and figure if I’m going to deal with the elements I would sooner do it in warmer waters.

I have decided to go over the high or thru it rather than sail under and around. This route will be slightly shorter but most likely no faster, but I feel safer given the time of year.

I will still have adequate rhumb line mileage for a credited circumnavigation.

AN IN SITE TO WHAT A TEAR IN THE SAIL LOOKS LIKE

AN IN SITE TO WHAT A TEAR IN THE SAIL LOOKS LIKE

THIS IS WHAT PATCHES LOOK LIKE SEWN ON A SAIL, OURS NOT IN COLOR THO

THIS IS WHAT PATCHES LOOK LIKE SEWN ON A SAIL, OURS NOT IN COLOR THO

DAY-156 24hr.Run=176nm.

Position: Lat.42*40’S Long.139*21’W

Weather=Wind= NE 12-25kts. Seas=NE 6-10ft. Cabin Temp=63*-67*. Bar=1005mb

Sailing fast today close on the wind with “Patches” rolled out just 10% reefed main, reefed mizzen and full staysail.

Now the reason “Patches is only 10% out is that she has three tears buried on the furled portion of the sail, and I need both a nice day and the desire to get her patched.

“Patches” however has become famous and here is a song that was written about her, by Liz Wilder a follower of the adventure:

If your happy and you know it, Patch it there!

If your sailing and you know it, Patch it here!

If your happy that your sailing and you know it needed Patching, then you just Patch it e.v.e.r.y.w.h.e.r.e.!!!” ha ha.

 

 

Yes, happy that I’m sailing and yes, I will no doubt be patching it everywhere, The Jefe’
 

 

AROUND ALONE DAYS 151-152-153

Day-151.24hr.Run=163nm. Pos: Lat.41*40’S. Long.150*14’W. Weather=Wind=W 12-18kts. Seas=6-8W. Cabin Temp=62*-67* Bar=1000mb

Day-152. 24hr Run=150 nm. Pos: Lat.41*54’S. Long.148*27’W. Weather=Wind=12-15 W. Seas=6-10ft W. Cabin Temp=60-65*. Bar=997mb

Day-153. 24hr.Run=152nm. Pos: Lat.41*22S. Long.145*48’W. Weather=Wind=20-40kts WNW. Seas= W 15-20ft. Cabin Temp=60-65*. Bar=1007mb

Total miles sailed so far=19,790nm.

Mile sailed last three days=465nm.

Miles left to sail until turning north=2553.

Top speed so far= 14.1kts.

THE REST OF THE STORY:

Day-151.
Once again “Sailors Run” is sailing fast along the course line.

There is a shallow spot in the ocean out here, about a day away along our course line. It was reported by the Vessel Sophia Christianson back in 1913, and is reported to be 30 ft. deep, and that seems strange as all the rest of the ocean in this area is three-miles deep. Oh well we will skirt by this one.

Debbie’s father passed away and Debbie was at the burial today, a very sad time for her. Debbie’s father had served in the US Air force in the special security squadron and could speak seven different languages. He was an all around good person and will be missed by those who knew him.

Temperatures are now quite pleasant aboard Sailors Run, and the Ecuadorian vegetable oil is almost  a liquid once again.

Day-152.
I awoke in the middle of the night to the sound of luffing sails, and we were about 60 * off course. I got my foul weather gear on and went top side.

I disconnected the wind vane and gave the wheel a spin and was shocked as I watched it spin like the wheel of fortune. Once again a steering cable has failed.
This sent a sense of fear through me as I have been unable to find the spare cables. You can only break these things so many times, and think they are going to reach far enough, to get them back together again.
The break was in the cable that had not failed last time, but the other cable was showing some broken strands where it attaches to the chain, and it also needed to be remade.
The repair took 8-hrs. In the end I had to drill out the chain to get a shackle to fit on to the end  to make up for lost wire. I also used my Makita cutting wheel to carefully cut the copper crimp off of the cable saving 4-inches of much needed cable length. These cables just barely went back on the quadrant, and if this should happen again, I will have to resort to the emergency tiller and make changes to the lines on the wind vane to be able to steer the boat.

Day-153.
Today not too much different from yesterday, as once again awakened by popping sails and off course.

I roll out of my berth and climb out into the cockpit to find out what the “HELL” is going on now.

It doesn’t take too long to discover the servo rudder on the wind vane has broken off now for the third time on this voyage, and is trailing in our wake behind the boat.

This will not be an easy fix, as the winds have risen to 30kts gusting 40 and the mizzen must be dropped as well as the small portion of “Patches” that is still flying rolled in on the furler.

Once that is completed we are now under stay sail alone and with 15-20 foot seas and heaving to is not a safe option as these seas are steep and some are breaking ,so I play with the balance of the boat and eventually get her sailing just a little down wind and she seems to nearly be sailing herself, allowing me to hang off the back of the boat and get the remaining piece of the breakaway tube out of the kick up hinge joint, where the servo rudder bolts into. I make up a new piece and bolt the servo rudder back into the hinge joint and after just 4-hrs of precarious goings on, we are being steered by the wind-vane once again, on course at good speed.

Dreaming of sitting with “Debbie” on a white sandy beach, under a sunbrella and sipping on an ice cold beer,

The Jefe’.

 

AROUND ALONE DAYS-148-149-150

SAILORS RUN,JEFF MOVING ALONG HEADING TO ECUADOR

SAILORS RUN,JEFF MOVING ALONG HEADING TO ECUADOR

Day-148 24hr Run=125 nm. Pos.-Lat.43*41’S. Long.156*00’W. Weather:Wind: E-12-15kts. Seas=6-8 ft. Cabin Temp=60-63* Bar=1010mb
Day-149 24 hr.Run=152 nm.Pos.-Lat.41*48’S. Long.155*09’W. Weather:Wind: E-SE-12-15 kts. Seas=6-8 ft. Cabin Temp=60-62* Bar=1006mb
Day-150 24 hr.Run:172 nm.Pos.-Lat.41*14’S. Long.152*30’W. Weather=Wind: S-12-17 kts Seas=S-6-8 ft. Cabin Temp=63-66* Bar=1002mb
Total miles sailed so far =19,326.

Total miles sailed last 3-days=449nm.

Miles left to go till turn north=2960nm.

Top speed so far =14.1kts.

THE REST OF THE STORY:

Day-148.
I awoke this am to Sailors Run moving along smoothly, and pretty much on course, but after I got up we had altered course and seemed to be going due north.
I go out on deck to ascertain what is happening, and realize we are surrounded by many micro wind systems, and to make it even worse “Patches has yet another 4-inch tear in her.
I feel like going below and looking in the mirror and asking my self is this really happening?
I decide “screw it” I’m going to have breakfast before tackling “Patches”.
After coffee and breakfast Patches is down on deck and I put on patch #44 and the sail goes back up quite smoothly.

Once we are sailing along at speed I decide to tack over as this course is almost due north, after the tack Sailors Run settles in on due south, and this is disappointing tacking through 180*, and it is obvious the seas on the nose and adverse current have virtually stopped all forward progress to the east.

I tack back to the north to get over the low that is to the NE of me. Once the sails are trimmed in I notice that “Patches now has an 18-inch tear in the middle of it, “Holy Shit” what next.

I refuse to bring the sail down again and the wind is rising, so I roll it in so that only 1/3rd is exposed and the tear is buried. I know this is hard on the sail, but at this point I just want to get some use out of It, and don’t care.

Day-149.
Today we are sailing fast and mostly to the north only making a little easting.
I have chosen to sail up alongside the low hoping to get a sling shot effect over the top of it in favorable winds.

Today at least there is no rain and I work below removing more mold from all surface areas, as God knows Debbie won’t want to be sleeping on no “moldy boat”.

My food supplies are dwindling as is my waist line. I have but two cereal breakfasts left and no more spam to go with the hot cakes to make my “Hawaiian” breakfast. I have but 6-packages of cookies left with four cookies in each one. The “propane” is a question mark and I just pray it makes it; “Sun Coffee ” anyone.
I soon will have to get creative with the breakfasts, like “Top Ramon” with a can of tuna and a can of vegetables in it as I have plenty of those ingredients and lots of canned fruit, as well as a piece of chocolate bar, for each of the remaining days.

Day-150.
“Wow” 5-months at sea and still 5000+ nautical miles to go.

We are now on top of the low and “hauling ass” in the right direction.

Our soon to be next big challenge is getting around the bottom of the very large South Pacific high as this can be tricky for three reasons:

First: It can move faster than we can,

Second: Often times there are lows embedded in its west side raising havoc with wind speed and directions.

Third: The Humboldt Current that runs up the coast of Chile can be a great asset or just plain dangerous should a high develop over the interior of Chile and then moves west onto the Pacific causing northern winds against this 2 knot current and square waves are formed in my path.

This only happens occasionally, and I pray we have a bit of good luck here.

Now that we are further north the world is a little fatter, and that is why our distance to the turn has decreased very little, but for now we are at least closer to Ecuador.

Somewhat traumatized by “Patches”, the Jefe”

 

THIS IS A T-SHIRT THEY GAVE US FOR WINNING THE BAJA HA HA RACE, WAS A SIZE EXTRA LG NOT SURE IF JEFF LOOKED LIKE THIS WHEN HE LEFT

THIS IS A T-SHIRT THEY GAVE US FOR WINNING THE BAJA HA HA RACE,
WAS A SIZE EXTRA LG
NOT SURE IF JEFF LOOKED LIKE THIS WHEN HE LEFT

 

THE SHIRT AFTER I ALTERED IT TO FIT JEFF & IMAGINE NOW HE IS SKINNIER THAN THIS LOOK

THE SHIRT AFTER I ALTERED IT TO FIT JEFF & IMAGINE NOW HE IS SKINNIER THAN THIS LOOK

AROUND ALONE DAY 145-146-147

DAY-145  24hr. Run=101nm. Pos. Lat.44*53’S Long. 161*01’W. Weather=Bar=1026mb. Wind=NE-N-8-15kts. Seas= N 4-6ft Cabin Temp=58*-63*.

DAY-146 24hr. Run=161nm.Pos. Lat.45*17S. Long.158*22’W. Weather=Bar=1018mb. Wind=N-NW. 12-15kts.Seas=4-6ft. NW. Cabin Temp=59*-62*.

DAY-147 24hr.Run=38nm. Pos. Lat.45*13’S. Long.157*00W.Weather= Bar=1013mb. Wind= WSW-5-8kts. Seas=W. 2-4ft. Cabin Temp=60-63*.

Total Miles sailed so far=18,877nm.

Miles sailed last three days=300nm.

Miles left to go before turning north=2,972nm.

Top speed so far= 14.1kts.

THE REST OF THE STORY:

DAY-145.
Sailing slow today, sailing as close to the wind as we can go and pounding into the waves.

I had decided that the weather was finally right to put “Patches” back up so wrestled the 50lb sail up the companion way steps, and attempted to bench press it through the narrow companion way opening.

After what seemed like way to long of a struggle, and ending up balancing the sail on my head while trying to get the sail clear of the edges where it was hanging up, I made that final all you can do bench press, and I mean this is like trying to bench press a “Buick”, as you are trying to lift the cabin top off the boat.

Finally at last out of “go-hetas”(push in Spanish), I let the sail fall back into the galley and regrouped. This time putting the sail in a sail bag and cranking it up with the mizzen halyard, and soon it was out in the cockpit.
It is then that the wind begins to pick up and I stuff “Patches” back down through the hatch where she had just emerged from. You see I’m not going to try and hoist this thing in a blow where once again it goes in the ocean.
I spent the rest of the morning wiping the surfaces of the galley down with vinegar to get rid of the mold that is taking up residence in my all too moist environment.

DAY-146.
We had sailed a good course through the night and the winds were now down and it was time to put “Patches” up before breakfast.
Once again it was a wrestling match getting the sail out of the boat and out around the mizzen rigging and finally up onto the fore deck.
I carefully begin razing the sail, checking countless times to be sure it was going in the foil correctly, and staying aboard  at the same time.

At last “Patches” was up and flying. After making fast the halyard I stepped around the staysail to admire my repair job. I almost “felt ill”, as I found myself looking at yet another 4-inch teat in “Patches”. The sail once again had to come down.
Once on deck the repair was easy and this time I used a product called “grab it” a Loctite product for gluing down flooring, as I’m running out of everything at this point.
Once again I start hauling the sail back up into the foil, it was about ¾ of the way up when the sail jammed in the foil as the sail had got in ahead of the 5mm luff line and I mean it was jammed.
I worked on it for over two hours and was still unable to pull it free, finally in desperation I got my exacto razor knife and was ready to try and cut it in the clear, not a good thing. I decided at the last minute to make one more attempt to get the feed alignment piece off, as on earlier attempts one of the screws would just not budge, but I had been spraying wd-40 on everything hoping something would loosen up and at last I got the feed unit off, and was able to pound it down the sail and free, and then with my vice grips I was able to tug the sail free of the foil it was jammed into.

After 7.5 hours ” Patches” was up and flying, and I could go drowned my “cotton mouth” in coffee and some much needed breakfast.
I had counted the patches on “Patches” and she now has 43 not counting the major big ones of the last big repair.

DAY-147.
Today slowly moving along the 45* of latitude in very light air, normally the highs would be above me and the lows to the south, but it seems some highs are south of me creating head winds, on the nose at times.
Having “Patches up there and no wind is like having a powerful motor with Dual 4-barrel carburetors and no gas.
Oh well, this is all part of sailing, never quite knowing what you will get from day to day.

The Jefe’ limping along the 45* South Latitude, in the not so “Roaring 40s”.

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